Vehicle Repair Shop in Kingman

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In Case You Leave Auto Repair To Some Professional Mechanic? Every car breaks down


at some point, and that's an undeniable fact! With that in mind, some cars are quite likely going to malfunctioning as opposed to others, of course, if you're in a tough situation, you may be left to wonder: must i attempt a DIY auto repair or employ a mechanic? An oil change is a superb example of something also a novice driver could do, but if you have problems beyond that, acquiring a car mechanic to do the repairs can be a wise decision and here's why: Experience You possess absolutely no idea what you're doing and you might actually end up making things worse. Even though you feel like you're a DIY savvy person, you can wind up causing other parts of the car to malfunction. Not to mention, you just do not know what's actually wrong together with your vehicle, unless you bring it apart and hope with all your might you are able to use it back together again again. An auto mechanic has been doing this for a long time and the man can certainly diagnose and repair any issue your vehicle might be up against. Right Tools You want the right tools and a decent workspace to get started on focusing on auto repair. Until you have a full garage with tools and equipment focused on this, you have got to put money into the required tools to correct your car. Needless to say, without prior experience coping with car repair, you may possibly not know what you ought to purchase, along with, you might never use these tools again. Hiring a professional car mechanic can eliminate the demand for anyone to invest money into equipment and tools you're unlikely to work with again while he will curently have everything on hand. Speedy Repairs If you simply have one household car you should employ to get to work towards time, you need to ensure your car is fixed as soon as possible. Needless to say, in the event you attempt a DIY repair, things will go wrong, as well as when they don't, normally it takes you a lot more time to get your car or truck running than if you decide to hire a mechanic. You could have your car or truck from commission for a day or two when taking it to a mechanic, but it sure beats not being able to go to work! Cut Costs Perhaps one of the more compelling top reasons to drop your automobile off for repair at the mechanic's is to save money. You won't must invest money into tools, equipment, and auto parts you might never need. Along with, while your car has run out of commission, you might need to rent an automobile or take the bus-- costing you more cash! Getting a mechanic for auto repair will save you within the long haul, particularly if you take into account that employment well done can prolong the lifestyle of your own vehicle. Next time your car gives you trouble, why not stop at a car mechanic's?





FAQ's Auto Repair

97 Camry Speed Sensor Issue.?
1997 Toyota Camry 2.2L 4 Cyl Auto Trans So I Have The Check Engine Light On, After I Replaced The Head Gasket, The Car Had All The Signs Of A Bad Speed Sensor, So I Replaced It And It Shifts Right, Up Until The Fuse For The Gauges Go Out, Then I Get The Same Problem And Get The Check Engine Light? What Could Be Wrong And How Much Approx Is This Fix? I Did Check The Connections And Grounds And Haven'T Been Able To Fix It. Help

If your fuse keeps going out then you have an electrical short somewhere along one of these wires. My suggestion is to find an electrician and get it fixed. I would say it will run you between 60 and 150. Can it be possible that at some point during the gasket change a wire was somehow caught in between two solid places causing it to ground out??? Happened to me. My head accidentally caught one of my injector wires causing it to ground out during the head install....Good Luck

Do I Have A Blown Head Gasket?
For The Past 2 Years I Have Done Just About Everything To Prevent My Car From Overheating. I Have A 1995 Toyota Camry With About 265,000 Miles. Whenever I Drive 60 Miles In Hot Weather My Car Temperature Goes Up. Ive Replaced The Thermostat, Thermostat Switch, Fan Relay, My Water Pump Is Fine, Ive Even Swapped Out 2 Aftermarket Radiators And No Luck. So Someone Said Its Probably My Head Gasket, What Do You Guys Think? How Would I Know If Its My Headgasket?

you have some idea if it,s the head gasket. does the anti-freeze keeps going down but you don,t have any leaks? and does white smoke come out the tailpipe? is there any anti-freeze in the oil? those things can let you know if it,s a head gasket or not. another thing is it really getting hot or is it just saying hot? it could be the temperature sending unit bad and showing hot when it,s not.

My Dad Is A Automotive Mechanic And Hes Looking For Employment.?
My Dads Looking For A Job He Has One High School Diploma. And Hes Half Deaf Hes Looking For A Job. Can Someone Please Hire Him Or Tell Me Where He Can Find A Job Hes Really Really Good Hes Been Working On Cars For 4-5 Years. I'Ve Been Looking For Jobs All Over Online But No One Will Reply Back To Me So If Anyone Knows Anything Please Email Me Or So. [=

Sounds like your dad has the right cheering team in place. It's great that you're helping your father online. You'll probably get some great ideas on Yahoo Answers. Here's a few that I hope may help.

There are many things your dad can do to get his name out there. First, he could start volunteering his services at charity organizations. It's a current trend that people are donating their older cars to these charities (Goodwill for example). These cars and trucks will eventually get auctioned off to the public. He could start volunteering to get them into shape for sale and to appraise their value (to protect the charity and increase their sales potential. They may need minor repairs and fixes that could double or triple their auction value. He might be of great value to these charities, and volunteering exposes your dad to the public and gets his name out there. I guarantee that people will start to talk about the "honest" mechanic who volunteered at Goodwill to check donated vehicles.

The other thing is that he needs to specialize in something that is in demand. He can remain a general mechanic, but sell any special skills or specialized knowledge to employers. For example, diesel fuel injectors or specific automatic transmissions may be good specializations. He could also get knowledgeable about "green" technologies, such as fuel efficiency products, flex fuels, hybrid battery technologies etc. Specializing in Green products might also get him hired to work for a new company on the ground floor as an installer.

There are sites that help the deaf find jobs. If he has significant hearing loss, employers who hire him can get grants, subsidies, and tax breaks for hiring the handi-capable. He has to get start getting registered with the local authorities. His family doctor might be able to help with this by evaluating his level of deafness. Once registered as being partially or legally deaf, he can go to websites that offer help to the deaf finding jobs, such as: http://www.vcaa.com/deafnews/jobs/. Once registered, he would also qualify for lots of help, such as getting for more training. He should also learn to sign and communicate with other deaf or partially deaf people. A deaf friend could be a wealth of information and there are many deaf friends who are anxious and willing to help anyone who is suffering because of their deafness.

Your dad should apply for federal, state, municipal and city positions as well. They are less likely to discriminate against the deaf or partially deaf. He could work on fire department vehicles, municipal vehicles, tractors, police and rescue vehicles, buses, etc. When municipal authorities make change-overs (going GREEN is big business) they hire temps to help install equipment. He needs to get his name out there.

The other thing is, people throw perfectly good lawn mowers, string trimmers, leaf blowers, etc, away. Many people make a good business out of turning these pieces of crap into pieces of gold. I heard that the number one problem with old lawn equipment is the fuel lines and carburetors get clogged or gummed up.

Good luck to you and your dad. You're doing a great thing by being on his support team.

Do I Have A Blown Head Gasket?
Thank You In Advance For Any Help You May Be Able To Provide. My Car Is A 95 Ford Contour And It Runs Great. Has 76,000 Miles On It And Its A Stick. I Just Payed A Mechanic 325 To Fix The Pullys On The Timing Belt, But I Have The Car Back And It Is Smelling Funny, Like Gas And Coolant. I Figure It Is Burning The Coolant Cause I Have To Refill The Reserve 3 Times A Week(At Least) I Loked In The Oil And There Is No Sighn Of Coolant In There, And Like I Said The Car Runs Fine. If There Are Any Suggestions That May Be Other Possible Causes Other Than A Blown Head, Please Help Me Out. I Really Cant Afford To Pay To Get A Head Replaced. So Again Thank You In Advance For Any Help You May Provide. Have A Great Weekend And Remember Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving..

i would return my car to the mechanic who did the work on your car and explain it to him. he may hve hooked up something incorrectly. or forgot to put somthing back on that he took off. at the very least he could diagnose if you have a new problem that had nothing to do with his work. I am an alignment technician and own my own shop. the words that i dread hearing the most are... "ever since you worked on my car.." but you can bet i'll do whatever it takes to make my customer happy.

'97 Ford Contour Overheating; No Pressure In Cooling System. Water Pump Gone Bad?
I Have A '97 Ford Contour Gl (2.0L 4-Cyl) That'S Been Having Problems With Overheating. I Changed The Thermostat, Drained And Backflushed Both The Radiator And Heater Core (No Signs Of Any Blockage) And After Hooking Everything Back Up, It Actually Overheats Even Faster Than Before. Reservoir Is Filled To The Max And The System Just Won'T Burp/Bleed. Pressure On The Lower Hose Seems Low As Does Pressure On The Heater Inlet/Outlet Hoses. There Doesn'T Seem To Be *Any* Pressure In The Upper Radiator Hose, But It Does Get Hot... From Steam. I Noticed This After Pulling The Hose Off A Good 20 Minutes After It Last Overheated. The Hose Was Bone Dry. I Tested The Thermostat By Boiling It In A Pot Of Water And It Opens And Closes Just Fine. Engine Seems To Run Strong And Sound Fine, But There Is Some Grayish (With A Tinge Of Brown) Smoke That Comes From The Exhaust When I Rev It Up To About 3K Rpms. Maybe The Beginnings Of A Leaking Head Gasket As Well? Help! :)

On the 2.0, I've had radiators flow but not enough to keep the engine from overheating.

Also to bleed the system, fill it up leave the radiator cap off , start the engine and run with the heater on max vent. It should burp fluid and air before it finally sucks it down hard one good time, then the top radiator hose should be hot and refill the jug and retighten the radiator cap and check to make sure the heater is putting out real hot.

Also one or two have had bad impellers on the water pump but usually that was a problem on 2.5 v-6s

Car Repair Marketing To Insurance?
I'M Working With My Group On A Marketing Project For School. It'S Our Job To Market A Car Detail Shop To Insurance Companies. The Ultimate Goal Is To Have Insurance Companies Recommend The Car Detail Shop For Fixes. How Do Insurance Companies Even Get A List Of That Kind Of Information And Who Qualifies As Someone On The Recommended List?

Automobile detailing shops are too specialized to be on a direct-repair shop list for an insurance company. You wouldn't market the detailer directly to the insurance company. You'd market the detail shop to the body shops that are on the direct-repair shop list the insurer has.

Many body shops sub-contract a dozen or so specialties out to sub contractors. These can include detailing, glass removal and installation, pin-striping, installation of large decals or graphics, complex wiring repairs, trim (seats and convertible tops), "paintless" dent repair work, and rental cars. Smaller body shops many sub-contract things like mechanical work, alignments, tires, airbag work, and frame work. Other than the glass companies these sub-contractors are generally considered too infrequently needed to bother with maintaining any sort of list. On the occasions they are needed the insurance claims adjuster either knows someplace directly or calls his local body shop to ask them.

Insurance claims that require detailing (in the sense that they need cleaning beyond a normal wash and vacuuming) are relatively uncommon. The two that come to mind are flood and extensive blood cleanup, both of which are normally associated with total losses. On rare occasions detailers are needed for things like a bunch of cars parked down-wind of something large being painted that were covered with over-spray, cars that ran over aerosol paint cans or wet road line paint, or damage done by wild animals that get into the car likes skunks or mice, but these are pretty rare.

Insurance companies develop their repair networks largely on word-of-mouth. A need is recognized by the insurer for a type of shop in such-and-such a place and they ask their local field appraiser who he would recommend in that area. The nearest local claims office then puts the shop on a list. Large insurers develop relatively complex tracking systems that "rate" each shop based on things like customer satisfaction surveys, days-to-repair times, and costs.

If you're able to change your marketing project plan then direct the detailers marketing efforts to smaller car dealers, auto body shops, limousine services and places like that. Most of the time these places will be able to handle most of their own detailing needs but they would need specialty shops for extreme or time consuming cases. Detailing is generally for people with lots of disposable income so marketing at places like marinas, tennis clubs, and golf courses would likely also pay off.