The Best 10
Durable Power Of Attorney in Kingman

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Durable Power Of Attorney in
86401, 86402, 86409, 86411, 86412, 86413, 86437, 86445
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How Do You Receive Legal Help/Aid In Order To Proceed With A Divorce?
I Am Currently Legally Separated And Have Been For Over 3 Years. I Would Like To Get A Divorce, But Cannot Afford Legal Fees, Because My Wife Refuses To Cooperate Or Sign Anything I Send Her. So I Was Wondering About Legal Aid/Help. I Am In The Air Force But They Don'T File Divorces. The Army Does, But There Are No Army Post'S Within My State. Please Help?

I am NOT a lawyer, or even a paralegal. I'm not giving you anything anywhere NEAR legal advice, okay? But I can tell you what I know from my own experience as a divorced person who has helped friends go through this kind of thing.

You aren't going to get any kind of legal aid unless you're an abuse victim, and it doesn't sound like that. You have a stable income, obviously, so you won't qualify as impoverished, either.

Bluntly: around here (Atlanta, Georgia) there are plenty of lawyers who advertise that they'll file uncontested divorces for around $300. There would be court and filing fees on top of that - maybe $100 or so? - but that's not that much money. If you're in the Air Force and effectively single, you're eligible to live in the barracks and eat on base. The best way to do this is to get that money together and have a lawyer file for you, because you will be protected against screwing anything up that could hurt you in the future. If you have any kids or property involved, do that. End of story.

If you're really stubborn and willing to gamble your future against your ability to work the legal system as an entirely ignorant newbie, AND there are no children or real property involved (real estate, that kind of thing), AND you don't have to work out any other kind of property settlement, you MAY be able to file your own divorce.

I did my own a few years ago, but it was definitely NOT contested and very simple - nobody was in the military, etc. I have no idea how being in the military could affect things! I've helped several friends get started on doing this, too - one went all the way through and successfully divorced, as I did. Again - both parties wanted to be divorced, no children, no property.

You'll need to get a "Do It Yourself Divorce" book specific to the state in which your wife has established legal residence, since that's the state that should have jurisdiction for the divorce (I think. Again, I don't know how your military status could change things!) Try to find out what state has jurisdiction before you get any books, ok? Maybe the Air Force has some kind of legal advice office or help line that will get you that far, at least.

Nolo Press is the best, but I think they only have a book for California. You may be able to check the book out of the library, but it would be best to buy it. Make sure you have the most recent edition of whatever you get, and go for something with forms on a CD, rather than something that you'll need to type into a word processor yourself. There are web sites that say they'll sell you all this in a package, but from what I've seen they don't do much, if anything, about explaining any of the laws to you - you get a bunch of forms and you're left wondering what the heck you're supposed to do next.

The book will walk you through which forms you need, how to fill them out, what to send and file where, etc.

Your wife doesn't have to sign anything or cooperate. If you know that she'll refuse, just don't bother to try. Have the court serve her with notice that you've filed for divorce. They'll tell her when the hearing is. She can choose to file something herself - a proposal for a different settlement, or whatever - but she can't stop the divorce. You can't be forced to stay married to her against your will. If she files something, you should be served with a copy of it, and then you should respond, or not, depending on what it is.

In many states, there's an automatic dual restraining order in force as soon as you file for divorce. That means you can't have ANY contact whatsover with your wife (in person, by mail/computer/phone - NONE), and as soon as she's served with notice of it, she can't have any with you. Respect it. Violating it will get you arrested and piss off the judge. You really don't want that.

On the court date, if nothing is contested, your wife may not even show up in court. The judge should read the papers, swear you in, maybe ask you some questions, and sign off. Then you're divorced.

Prepaid Legal Services Scammer?
A Regular Customer Approached Me At Work On Day. He Proceeded To Tell Me About A Company Called Pre Paid Legal Services And How I Can Make Money. Long Story Short I Knew It Was A Pyramid Scheme The Second He Opened His Mouth. I Told Him I Wasn'T Interested. Now He Keeps Approaching Me About It Trying To Make It Sound Better And Better. I Told Him Again And Again I'M Not Interested And That I Believe In Making Money The Honest Way. My Work Won'T Kick Him Out Because He'S A Potential Customer (Cha Ching)....Can I Report Him And Get Him In Trouble For Being Involved In A Pyramid Scheme? Are Pyramid Schemes Illegal?

You ask a great question! Pyramid schemes (usually called MLMs or Network Marketing) are legal and legitimate IF they sell a REAL PRODUCT OR SERVICE. They are illegal if there is really no product, just a business opportunity.

So the question you need to ask "Is there a legitimate service here?" and "would I buy this service if there was no business opportunity". With Pre-Paid Legal Services, there is a legitimate service. Over 1.4 million people pay a monthly fee to be members and to use their services (they can cancel at any time but over 73% keep the service!

I have been a member for over 10 years and my family has benefited from it. My son was awarded $11,500 in a case where the insurance company initially want to pay him $1000 for injuries suffered when he was hit in a cross walk. I was able to negotiate a $60, 000 settlement when I learned from my Pre-Paid Legal lawyer that what my employer had done to me was illegal!

What I am concerned about is the way this person has been harassing you. He has stopped your from really taking a look at an opportunity and a service that could be beneficial for you.

Pre-Paid Legal was recently purchased by a New York equity company (MidOcean Partners) for $650 million because they believe that this is the way North Americans will access legal service in the future (like 80% of Europeans have for over 100 years!).They renamed it LegalShield.

Don't just dismiss this because of a jerk. And don't paint every business opportunity as a scam - but do your due diligence. By the way, if you do not make as much money as your boss or your bosses boss, does that make your job a scam? No it is just how businesses are set up!

Do You Think This Could Be A Possible Lawsuit?
I Work At A Mall, I Was Loading Some Merchandise For My Company And Had To Go Throught The Loading Zone Of The Mall. There Is Some Construction Going On, There Are A Bunch Of Old Doors And Metal Parts Laying Around With No Signs Of &Quot;Contruction&Quot;, Or &Quot;Caution&Quot; Signs What So Ever. There Was A Huge Pice Of Metal Right By The Doorway Where It Obviously Should Not Have Been. While Walking By My Arm Was Cut On A Very Rusty Piece Of Metal. About A 10Cm Gash, I Was Bleeding Non Stop For About 2 Hours. I Didnt Want It To Get Infected So I Went To A Near-By Hospital To Get A Tetnanus Shot And Get It Cleaned Up. It Did Not Require Stiches However It Hurts And I Feel It Was Very Inconvieniant For Me To Go Through This. Now I Have A Big Bandage Going Around My Arm. Thoughts Please?

Lawsuit?

Why? Were you blind when walking through there? Did you not see this stuff? Would a sign saying "construction zone" have alerted you more to the fact that stuff was lying around? Does it take a "caution" sign for you to pay attention to your surroundings?

Wouldn't a little common sense have been more in order?

So you cut your arm and a HUGE piece of metal because there wasn't a "caution" sign posted on it. Like you couldn't see a HUGE piece of metal was there without a caution sign.

And are you not cautious around this type of thing without being told by a sign to be cautious?

So what you should have done was notify your manager/supervisor that you had an injury. They have procedures for such things. Such as seeing you got first aid or medical care.

But no - you continued to bleed for 2 hours and took yourself off to the hospital. So now you have no proof that you were injured at work because you didn't report it.

And by the way - I doubt it was a "gash" if there were no stitches involved.

So, what kind of lawsuit do you have in mind? I've never heard of one being filed for inconvenience.

Yes, I believe a cut on the arm will hurt for a day or two. However, doesn't prevent you from being on the computer - does it?

So, no, I don't think you have a legitimate lawsuit. You didn't report it when it happened. You waited 2 hours and dealt with it on your own. So you can't even prove that it happened at work. You didn't give your employer an opportunity to help you. There weren't even any stitches so you aren't even injured that badly.

Be sure you put "caution" signs around your house so people will not walk blindly into the walls.

How Many People Die From Drunk Driving Every Year?

Drunk driving is no accident.

There were 16,885 alcohol-related fatalities in 2005 – 39 percent of the total traffic fatalities for the year.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), "A motor vehicle crash is considered to be alcohol-related if at least one driver or non-occupant (such as a pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash is determined to have had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .01 gram per deciliter (g/dL) or higher. Thus, any fatality that occurs in an alcohol-related crash is considered an alcohol-related fatality. The term 'alcohol-related' does not indicate that a crash or fatality was caused by the presence of alcohol."

Note the last paragraph, and in particular, the last sentence. This would seem to make the statistics below a little misleading since we tend to think that alcohol-related crashes are caused by drunk drivers. But if a sober driver kills an alcohol-impaired pedestrian, it's still considered an alcohol-related crash. Does this invalidate the drunk driving statistics below? No. The statistics reveal that most fatal alcohol-related crashes do indeed involve drunk drivers and far fewer of these fatalities involve intoxicated pedestrians or "bicyclists and other cyclists".

Nationwide in 2005, alcohol was present in 24 percent of the drivers involved in fatal crashes (BAC .01-.07, 4 percent; BAC .08 or greater, 20 percent).

The 16,885 alcohol-related fatalities in 2005 (39% of total traffic fatalities for the year) represent a 5-percent reduction from the 17,732 alcohol related fatalities reported in 1995 (42% of the total).

The 16,885 fatalities in alcohol-related crashes during 2005 represent an average
of one alcohol-related fatality every 31 minutes.

Of the 16,885 people who died in alcohol-related crashes in 2005, 14,539 (86%) were killed in crashes where at least one driver or nonoccupant had a BAC of .08 or higher.

The drunk driving statistics show that raffic fatalities in alcohol-related crashes fell by 0.2 percent, from 16,919 in 2004 to 16,885 in 2005. [Note that this figure for 2004 is higher than what we've shown for 2004 (16,694 deaths) because our data came from preliminary reports. The final government report counted more drunk driving deaths.]

NHTSA estimates that alcohol was involved in 39 percent of fatal crashes and in
7 percent of all crashes in 2005. The national rate of alcohol-related fatalities in
motor vehicle crashes in 2005 was 0.57 per 100 million vehicle miles traveled.

An estimated 254,000 persons were injured in crashes where police reported that alcohol was present — an average of one person injured approximately every 2 minutes.

In 2004, the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program
estimated that over 1.4 million drivers were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics. This is an arrest rate of 1 for every 139 licensed
drivers in the United States. (2005 data not yet available.)

In 2005, 21 percent of the children age 14 and younger who were killed in motor
vehicle crashes were killed in alcohol-related crashes.

In 2005, a total of 414 (21%) of the fatalities among children age 14 and younger
occurred in crashes involving alcohol. Of those 414 fatalities, more than half (224)
of those killed were passengers in vehicles with drivers with BAC levels of .01 or higher.

Another 48 children age 14 and younger who were killed in traffic crashes in 2005
were pedestrians or pedalcyclists who were struck by drivers with BAC .01 or higher.

The rate of alcohol involvement in fatal crashes is more than 3 times higher
at night as during the day. For all crashes, the alcohol involvement rate is 5 times higher at night.

The highest percentage of drivers in fatal crashes who had BAC levels of .08 or
higher was for drivers ages 21 to 24 followed by the 25 to 34 age group.

click for stats and charts of fatalities since the 90's to 2005:
http://www.alcoholalert.com/drunk-driving-statistics-2005.html

One Of The Best Lawyers At My Law Firm Has Been Acting Up?
I'Ve Been In The Law Business For About 20 Years, And I'Ve Known This Guy Since I Was A Child. We Started Our Law Firm Together Back In 97, It'S Been A Great Many Years Working With Him. He'S The Star Of Our Firm, He Has A 87 Percent Win Rate, And Always Brings In Customers And Money To Our Business. But Ever Since He Reached His 40Th Birthday, He'S Been Acting Very Strange. He'S Been Showing Up To Work Late, Sometimes Drunk Or High. He Messed Up A Major Case I Assigned Him Too, And As A Result We Lost A Great Sum Of Money. He'S Been Cheating On His Wife Of 10 Years With A College Student. Yesterday I Called Him To Ask Him Where He Was And If He Was Okay. He Said He Thought He Might Be Sick. When If He Had The Flu, He Said &Quot;No, I Think I Have Bieber Fever.&Quot; Then He Hung Up! Should I Fire Him, Or Get Him Help? The Guy'S Been My Best Friend For 40 Years, I Don'T Know What To Do, Help Me! Please!

Sounds like a midlife crisis to me...

What Are The Major Differences Between Civil And Criminal Law?

In civil law, a private party (e.g., a corporation or individual person) files the lawsuit and becomes the plaintiff. In criminal law, the litigation is always filed by the government, who is called the prosecution.

One of the most fundamental distinctions between civil and criminal law is in the notion of punishment.

In criminal law, a guilty defendant is punished by either (1) incarceration in a jail or prison, (2) fine paid to the government, or, in exceptional cases, (3) execution of the defendant: the death penalty. Crimes are divided into two broad classes: felonies have a maximum possible sentence of more than one year incarceration, misdemeanors have a maximum possible sentence of less than one year incarceration.


In contrast, a defendant in civil litigation is never incarcerated and never executed. In general, a losing defendant in civil litigation only reimburses the plaintiff for losses caused by the defendant's behavior.

So-called punitive damages are never awarded in a civil case under contract law. In a civil case under tort law, there is a possibility of punitive damages, if the defendant's conduct is egregious and had either (1) a malicious intent (i.e., desire to cause harm), (2) gross negligence (i.e., conscious indifference), or (3) a willful disregard for the rights of others. The use of punitive damages makes a public example of the defendant and supposedly deters future wrongful conduct by others. Punitive damages are particularly important in torts involving dignitary harms (e.g., invasion of privacy) and civil rights, where the actual monetary injury to plaintiff(s) may be small.

One can purchase insurance that will pay damages and attorney's fees for tort claims. Such insurance coverage is a standard part of homeowner's insurance policies, automobile insurance, and insurance for businesses. In contrast, it is not possible for a defendant to purchase insurance to pay for his/her criminal acts.

While a court can order a defendant to pay damages, the plaintiff may receive nothing if the defendant has no assets and no insurance, or if the defendant is skillful in concealing assets. In this way, large awards for plaintiffs in tort cases are often an illusion.