Emergency Vet Clinic in Kingman

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Emergency Vet Clinic in
86401, 86402, 86409, 86411, 86412, 86413, 86437, 86445

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FAQ

I'M Thinking About Becoming A Veterinarian?
I'M Thinking About Becoming A Veterinarian, But The Thing Is I'M Not Sure I Can Perform The Surgery Or Euthanize The Pets That Need It. Although It Has Always Been My Dream Job To Be A Veterinarian. Is It Possible For A Veterinarian To Not Do Those Things? For The Past Couple Hours I'Ve Been Looking At Videos Where Veterinarians Perform Surgery, And I Just Don'T Think I Would Ever Be Able To Do It. Does That Mean My Dreams Are Crushed For Becoming A Vet?

There are veterinarians that do not perform surgery and veterinarians that don't euthanize. However, those that do not have specialized in some area where these tasks are not required. Radiologists for example do neither of those things. Neither do pathologists. However, both of those also have very little actual contact with animals. Anesthesiologists don't typically do either of these things but they are present during the surgery.
Internal medicine specialists do not perform surgery but do frequently need to euthanize animals.
If you want to be a general practitioner then you will be required to perform both of these tasks. Imagine taking your beloved pet to a veterinarian for it's whole life. Finally the time comes to put him down and the vet who you've been seeing for 10 years tells you she is unable to do it and sends you to a stranger. Clients do not accept this. As a general practitioner you will be expected to perform basic surgeries such as spays and neuters. Sending these common procedures away will not allow your clinic to survive.
Even if you do opt for one of the specialists that don't perform either of these procedures you will still be required to do both of them during your training. You will not get through vet school without performing surgery and it's very unlikely you won't come across a patient that requires euthanasia during school.

Some Questions About Veterinarians?
Hello There. I'M Nicole. So, My Life Long Dream Is To Become A Veterinarian. Ever Since I Was A Little Girl. I Have A Deep, Undying Passion For Animals. But I Have Quite A Few Questions About The Profession. Primarily About The Schooling Required To Be A Legal Veterinarian In The State Of Mississippi. So Here Are My Questions: 1) What Schooling Is Required? The Main School I Have My Eye On Is Mississippi State University. It Is A Four Year Program. But Do I Have To Go To Some Other College First? The Requirements On The Msu Website Seem Far Too Many For A High School Graduate. Could You Give Me A Full List Of What I Need To Do, Step By Step, To Become A Veterinarian? Or What You Did? 2) What Can I Do Now, In High School, To Better My Chances In The Veterinary World? I Am A Sophomore, Intending To Apply To Mississippi School For Mathematics And Science, Which Is A Rather Prestigious Boarding School For Juniors And Seniors In High School. If I Can Get In, That Is. Hopefully, Having Graduated From There Would Make My Resume More Desirable, Seeing As Though Math And Science Are The Key Components In Veterinary Medicine. I Also Currently Volunteer For My County'S Shelter And Intend To Volunteer At My Local Vet'S Office When I Am Old Enough. 3) I'M Also Considering The Possibility Of Becoming A Veterinary Technician, Thoughts On That? 4) Any Tips? Advice? I Greatly Appreciate Any Answers To This Question. They Mean A Great Deal. Thank You.

The path to becoming a veterinarian involves four years of college, followed by four years of vet school. You'll need excellent grades in college because it's extremely difficult to get into veterinary school. Becoming a vet tech in Mississippi may require either certification after taking some community college courses or being trained by a veterinarian. You can ask your local vet once you start volunteering. A vet tech job doesn't pay much -- the median salary is $23,000/year nationwide and probably less in Mississippi.

Should I Call Out The Emergency Vet?
I'Ve Come Home To Find My Cat Has An Injury On Her Hip. There Is A Large Amount Of Fur Missing And Skin Missing About The Size Of My Little Finger Nail. It'S Bleeding Quite A Bit But She Won'T Let Me Near Her To Do Anything. It'S Saturday At 11Pm. Should I Call The Emergency Vet Now, Should I Call Them Tomorrow, Or Should I Let The Cat Deal With It Herself And Just Get It Checked On Monday?

Call the emergency vet NOW. Your cat will probably hurt itself further if you do not. Bleeding is to be taken very seriously. Call the Emergency Vet and find a way to catch your cat and put her in a carrier (possibly wrapped in a towel) to get her to the vet.

I'm sorry, I know you are probably going through a bit of shock yourself, but this is serious and your cat trusts you to take care of her so please do what has to be done as quickly as you can.

If I can help at all please contact me.

Sending good wishes and positive energy your way,
~Raven, The Cat Lady

Do You Think &Quot;Weekend Emergency&Quot; Vets Are A Rip Off?
We Had To Take Our German Shepard In 2 Weeks Ago On A Sunday. He Was Running And Caught Himself On The Corner Of The Race Car Trailer And Tore His Skin Bad. He Had To Have It Stapled. 35 Of Them. The Whole Thing Cost 400.00! Then, He Had To Go Back To Get The Tube Remove, That Was There For Drainage. That Cost 25.00. Now, We Got The Staples Out Yesterday, And He Needs Another Surgery, Because They Didn'T Cut Enough Skin When They Did The First Operation. (From Trauma Like That, Some Skin Dies Off. So They Cut Some Off To Take Care Of It.) He Will Need About 10 To 13 More Staple To Finish Closing Him Up. Why Do They Charge So Much Just Because It'S A Weekend!?

That's why I only use the emergency vets for the initial emergency. I then take my dogs to my regular vet because she knows my dogs. Yes, they cost more because they are working the hours regular vets don't want to. Where there is a demand there is the cost of going there. My regular vet will call them as a follow up but, I don't take them back there for follow up and such. They will just soak you with a high bill because they know you aren't a frequent customer.

What Is The Difference Between Veterinary Science And Veterinary Medicine ?
I Was Planning To Take A Bachelor'S Degree In Veterinary But I Don'T Know Which On Above To Choose...

*Veterinary science is vital to the study and protection of animal
production practices, herd health and monitoring the spread of disease.

*Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals.

Veterinary Assisting, Or Associate Of Applied Science..?
What Is The Diffrence In Career Studies Certificate In Veterinary Assisting Or An Associate Of Applied Science Degree In Veterinary Technology? Which Is Better?

The difference between a veterinary techician and a veterinary assistant are the education and credentialling requirements.
No state in the US has any educational requirements for working as a veterinary ASSISTANT. This is an entry level-position in a veterinary facility and training is generally done on the job. Because most training is done on the job it is often very cursory and lacks the depth and breadth of a formal education. Veterinary assistants are generally taught the basic how-to but not the why or when you would do something different. They tend to do basic tasks such as animal restraint, basic care and sanitation, assist in patient monitoring, prepare instruments for use in surgeries or daily treatments, they may give medication as prescribed by the veterinarian, collect biological samples and perform basic diagnostic tests like reading fecals. Veterinary assistants are generally not the equivalent of a formally educated veterinary technician. For example, I know many assistants who can place an IV catheter and hook up a fluid line to it, but they generally don't know how to calculate the appropriate amount of fluids to give in a 24 hour period to maintain hydration, replace lost fluids from vomiting/diarrhea, calculate the appropriate number of drops per hour to provide the correct amount of fluids or understand the different types of IV fluids available and when each type is appropriate to a given situation. They may monitor anesthesia but they generally don't know how the different anesthetic drugs they are giving affect the body other than producing sedation or anesthesia---do they cause a drop in blood pressure that needs to be compensated for, do they make it more likely for animals that have seizures to have one, do they need to change the anesthetic protocol to compensate for heart, liver or kidney issues in a given patient. Veterinary assistants generally require much more supervision than a credentialed veterinary technician

There are voluntary educational opportunities, however these are not equivalent to a college degree program and are instead basic vocational training. There is no over-sight by a professional body to ensure that the majority of these programs provide adequate or correct information. There is no requirement for hands-on training and instructors often have little or no experience or education in the veterinary field. There are a handful of certification programs that are designed and approved by veterinary professional organizations or that are offered by colleges which also offer accredited veteirnary technology programs and these are better choices for someone who wants to be a veterinary assistant.

Veterinary technicians are required (in most states) to have a 2 year degree in veterinary technology from an AVMA accredited veterinary technology program, to have passed the Veterinary Technician National Exam and a state exam in order to be credentialed. They are also generally required to attend a set number of continuing education courses each year to keep up with changes in veterinary medicine. Veterinary technicians are educated in veterinary anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, animal husbandry, surgical assisting, anesthesia, medical nursing, diagnostics such as radiology and ultrasonography, clinical pathology, parasitology, medical terminology and record keeping, biological collection and sample handling and preperation, etc. They can also specialize in areas such as emergency and critical care, internal medicine, anesthesia, dentistry, behavior and equine nursing.

The American Veterinary Medical Association maintains a list of accredited degree programs on their website: Inhttp://www.avma.org/education/cvea/vette...

In some states, the use of the title "veterinary technician" and the practice of veterinary technology is recognized as profession and licensure is required. In other states, veterinary technicians are registered or certified. The laws that govern veterinary technicians vary from state to state so for specific information on the laws a person should check their state veterinary practice act or contact their state veterinary licensing board.