Veterinary Medicine in Kingman

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Veterinary Medicine in
86401, 86402, 86409, 86411, 86412, 86413, 86437, 86445

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FAQ

Question About Veterinarians?
I'M Working On A Career Project For School My Topic Is Veterinarian. I Need To Know What Is The Type Of Vet Called That Works With Animals Like Dogs, Cats, Birds, Hamsters Those Sort Of Things. Ive Heard Things Like Labatory Animal Veterianrian Umm Clinical Something Veterinarinan. But I Need The Full Wrote Out Type Of Vet It Is Under That Catagory.

I'm not sure if there is a specific veterinary specialty that would describe this type of practice. A small animal veterinarian might see all of these different animals. They might be board certified in veterinary internal medicine (http://www.acvim.org/websites/acvim/inde... ) or in one or more animal through the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners (http://www.abvp.com/categories_practice.... ). Veterinary toxicologists, cardiologists, radiologists, etc. might also specialize in a variety of animals. Laboratory animal veterinarians specialize in the treatment of common lab animals covering a wide range of species, from zebra fish to rats to macaques (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal_test... ). They would probably not see very many cats, dogs or birds since these animals are not commonly used in scientific laboratories, although it is not impossible.

Info About Veterinarians?
I'M Planing To Be A Veterinarian After Graduating Highschool And I Was Wondering If Someone Could Help Me With A Little Info. Well You Know That Certain Veterinarians Work With Different Animals, Small Animals Which Would Include; Dogs, Cats, Birds... And Large Animals; Horses,Cows, Whales... Well What I Would Like To Know Is What Area Would I Be If I Wanted To Work At A Zoo; Would I Say Zoo Vet Or Large Animals Or Exotic Animals? And What Courses Should I Take In College For This Career?

If you want to be an exotic vet you essentially get the exact same education as every other veterinarian. When you graduate from vet school you are considered qualified to practice on any species except humans. The national boards you take does not discriminate and you must know it all regardless of what species you're planning to work with.
You'll need to do 4 years of undergrad work and 4 years of vet school. You would do the same pre-vet coursework as everyone else. You can find the requirements for your school(s) of choice here: http://www.aavmc.org
Also during those first 4 years you will need to earn a bachelor's degree. Since you want to work on exotics you might consider majoring in wildlife biology, zoology, or something like that as opposed to animal science or biology that many of you're colleagues might choose.
Once in vet school you will again take many of the same classes as your classmates. Generally speaking there is very little exotic education in vet school. Most schools have a class or two and maybe some electives you can take, but not nearly as much info as for dogs, cats, cattle and horses. However, the information about domestic species is often applied to exotic animal care. So, you might not get a lot of information about tigers and lions but you can apply the info you've learned as cats. While you're in vet school try to attend exotic animal club meeting and conferences to try to get additional information. Also, use your summers and breaks in vet school to try to get externships or preceptorships at zoos, aquariums, wildlife centers, etc. This is yet another way to get additional exotic experience. Not all schools have an exotics ward in their hospital. If yours doesn't then it's even more reason to find externships during your clinical year at other schools or zoos.
The real exotic training comes after vet school. Zoo medicine is one of the most competitive specialties in vet med. Most zoos will no longer hire a vet unless they are board certified in exotic animal medicine. This will involve an additional 4-5 years of specialized training after vet school. You'd need at least one year internship (possibly 2 years) and then a 3 year residency. Then you'd sit for the board exam, but even then a position in a zoo is not guaranteed. It's far from impossible though as the previous poster suggested. More and more zoos are seeing the need to have a full-time vet on staff. The hardest part is going to be getting an exotic internship and residency. Networking and contacts are going to be essential to get into this field. Keep in mind also, that zoo vets typically make less than a small animal general practitioner and much much less than a vet that's boarded in a different specialty.

Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound A Good Major For Veterinary School?
So At One School I Am Looking At, They Offer Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound As A Major. Would This Be A Good Option If I Am Looking At Vet School? I Mean I Know I Will Also Have To Meet The Vet Schools Prerequisites, But Would This Be Good? Thanks!

You have raised a very interesting question. I am going to discuss it on the premise that program you mentioned is a four-year program which leads to a bachelor's degree. A two-year associate program would not be appropriate as few, if any, of its credits would transfer to a university pre-vet program.

If you had asked about a four-year bachelor of science in nursing program, my answer would be that it is not an appropriate pre-vet major. Medical schools and presumably veterinary schools would consider your going on for a career other than nursing to be a waste of an educational experience and degree which could have been awarded to a person who would go on to become a nurse. They would hold the nursing degree against the applicant.

I cannot see any valid distinction between nursing and diagnostic sonography in this context. So my conclusion is that diagnostic sonography is not a good pre-vet major.

May I suggest animal science, chemical engineering, biological engineering, and biomedical engineering as pre-vet majors which will provide good preparation for veterinary school as well as good career opportunities, which will pay much more than diagnostic sonography, for the more than five out of seven veterinary school applicants nationwide who are not admitted to any veterinary school.

What Colleges Have A Great Veterinary/Medical Program?
In The U.S. Or Europe! I'M Looking To Pursue A Veterinary Career Or A Medical/Nursing Career. Thanks In Advance! :)

First of all, those are three very different programs, and schools might only offer a few if any of them. Second, you must do your medical training in the country in which you live and plan to work. It does NOT easily transfer to another country. If you're not a US citizen, you can pretty much forget about med school here; most won't take foreign applicants.

You can major in nursing in college if you want to be a nurse. That's how you become a nurse. To be a doctor or a vet, you'd major in anything in college (but NOT nursing) and take the pre-med or pre-vet classes. Then you'd apply to medical or vet schools after college. Both are extremely competitive programs; going to a school for your bachelors doesn't mean you'll get in for med school. Sure, there are some great programs you could be applying to in 4-7 years, depending on where you are now. But most people are lucky to get into any program, since so many won't get in at all. You usually can't be picky.

What Is The Difference Between Veterinary Science And Veterinary Medicine ?
I Was Planning To Take A Bachelor'S Degree In Veterinary But I Don'T Know Which On Above To Choose...

*Veterinary science is vital to the study and protection of animal
production practices, herd health and monitoring the spread of disease.

*Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals.

Veterinary Assisting, Or Associate Of Applied Science..?
What Is The Diffrence In Career Studies Certificate In Veterinary Assisting Or An Associate Of Applied Science Degree In Veterinary Technology? Which Is Better?

The difference between a veterinary techician and a veterinary assistant are the education and credentialling requirements.
No state in the US has any educational requirements for working as a veterinary ASSISTANT. This is an entry level-position in a veterinary facility and training is generally done on the job. Because most training is done on the job it is often very cursory and lacks the depth and breadth of a formal education. Veterinary assistants are generally taught the basic how-to but not the why or when you would do something different. They tend to do basic tasks such as animal restraint, basic care and sanitation, assist in patient monitoring, prepare instruments for use in surgeries or daily treatments, they may give medication as prescribed by the veterinarian, collect biological samples and perform basic diagnostic tests like reading fecals. Veterinary assistants are generally not the equivalent of a formally educated veterinary technician. For example, I know many assistants who can place an IV catheter and hook up a fluid line to it, but they generally don't know how to calculate the appropriate amount of fluids to give in a 24 hour period to maintain hydration, replace lost fluids from vomiting/diarrhea, calculate the appropriate number of drops per hour to provide the correct amount of fluids or understand the different types of IV fluids available and when each type is appropriate to a given situation. They may monitor anesthesia but they generally don't know how the different anesthetic drugs they are giving affect the body other than producing sedation or anesthesia---do they cause a drop in blood pressure that needs to be compensated for, do they make it more likely for animals that have seizures to have one, do they need to change the anesthetic protocol to compensate for heart, liver or kidney issues in a given patient. Veterinary assistants generally require much more supervision than a credentialed veterinary technician

There are voluntary educational opportunities, however these are not equivalent to a college degree program and are instead basic vocational training. There is no over-sight by a professional body to ensure that the majority of these programs provide adequate or correct information. There is no requirement for hands-on training and instructors often have little or no experience or education in the veterinary field. There are a handful of certification programs that are designed and approved by veterinary professional organizations or that are offered by colleges which also offer accredited veteirnary technology programs and these are better choices for someone who wants to be a veterinary assistant.

Veterinary technicians are required (in most states) to have a 2 year degree in veterinary technology from an AVMA accredited veterinary technology program, to have passed the Veterinary Technician National Exam and a state exam in order to be credentialed. They are also generally required to attend a set number of continuing education courses each year to keep up with changes in veterinary medicine. Veterinary technicians are educated in veterinary anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, animal husbandry, surgical assisting, anesthesia, medical nursing, diagnostics such as radiology and ultrasonography, clinical pathology, parasitology, medical terminology and record keeping, biological collection and sample handling and preperation, etc. They can also specialize in areas such as emergency and critical care, internal medicine, anesthesia, dentistry, behavior and equine nursing.

The American Veterinary Medical Association maintains a list of accredited degree programs on their website: Inhttp://www.avma.org/education/cvea/vette...

In some states, the use of the title "veterinary technician" and the practice of veterinary technology is recognized as profession and licensure is required. In other states, veterinary technicians are registered or certified. The laws that govern veterinary technicians vary from state to state so for specific information on the laws a person should check their state veterinary practice act or contact their state veterinary licensing board.