Vets in Kingman

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Vets in
86401, 86402, 86409, 86411, 86412, 86413, 86437, 86445

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FAQ

Should I Take My Puppy To A 24 Hour Vet Or Wait Til Morning?
I Came Home From Work And Took My 9 Month Old Puppy Out And Played For About 15 Minutes And She Was Fine. When We Came Back In, She Immediately Layed Down And Wouldn'T Get Up. After A While She Got Up, Drank A Bunch Of Water, And Then Threw Up Green Liquid. Now She Is Laying Down Again And Will Hardly Lift Her Head. Her Gums And Tongue Are Also Unusually White. Can I Wait Til Morning To Take Her To The Vet Or Is This Emergency Vet Time?

take her now, i had a puppy a couple of years ago that a few days after i got it seemed fine one minute and the next it started out with the lethargy and puking, then she got diahrea when I took her in to the vet it turned out to be parvo and they recommended that I put her down. I AM NOT saying that is what your dog has!! just take her in immediatly to be sure...she might have even eaten something that has upset her belly or it could be a number of things..better safe than sorry!
I found this when I googled pale gums maybe it might help:
Warning Signs of Serious Disease in Dogs

1. Protracted vomiting and diarrhea

There are at least 63 causes of vomiting in dogs, but the most common cause is simply known as dietary indiscretion. Dogs who get into the trash, eat animal carcasses or drink pond water all can end up with very dicey gastrointestinal tracts.

Other more serious causes of vomiting and diarrhea include diseases of the pancreas, liver or kidney, or other primary intestinal diseases such as a blockage, parasites, cancer, ulcers or inflammation. Your veterinarian may need laboratory tests and X-rays to sort these out.

The first important criteria is to confirm that your dog is drinking water and able to hold it down without vomiting. Then, evaluate your dog’s attitude: Is she lethargic, lacking appetite and not interested in her usual activities? This can be a sign of serious underlying disease. Finally, note whether the vomiting and diarrhea appear to be worsening or fail to improve in 24 hours. Without improvement in 24 to 36 hours, it is time for a visit with your veterinarian to rule out serious disease.

2. Pale gums

Lift up your dog’s upper lip and notice the gum color. It should be a vibrant pink. An early warning sign of serious disease is pale gums. Anemia, caused by a lack of red blood cells, will give your dog’s gums a ghostly pallor. Anemia has many causes, and your vet will have to sort this out.

Usually pale gums are accompanied by lethargy. Dogs who eat rodent poison can start to bleed slowly internally, and pale gums would be the first sign a dog owner would notice. Dogs who are bleeding from their spleen may be fine one minute, then collapse the next as the bleeding worsens. Any sign of pale gums warrants an emergency visit to the vet.

http://www.grit.com/country-vet/2007-05-01/

My Dog Is Acting Strange And We Do Not Have A 24 Hour Vet...?
So... My Dog Is Acting A Bit Strange Tonight. Normally I'D Take Her To The Vet, But It'S Late And We Do Not Have A 24 Hour Vet, So I Turn To The World Of Yahooanswers. Her Symptoms Include Excessive Thirst And A Dull Coat. She Whines When I Touch Her Sides, But I Do Not See Physical Issues To Deal With. The Thing That Bothers Me The Most Is That She Is Backing Up And Circling Off To The Left Almost Like She Can'T Help Herself. My Question To All Of You Is This, What Do You Think May Be Wrong With Her?

Try calling some of the local vets and even if not local call some farther away, at least one of them will take after hours phone calls and give you advice. Just last night I called my vet clinic at 10, I was sent to an automated answering service, which then sent me to an operator, who then took my number and had my vet give me a call back, I then explained to my vet what my puppys symptoms where and she gave me instructions on what to do.

I Found A Dog And He Needs Vet Care However I Don'T Have The Money?
Is There Any Kind Of Grants That Will Pay For Him To Get Seen By A Vet? I Need To Rehomme Him But No One Wants Him And Our Animal Shelter Will Not Come Get Him!

Enter your zip code into PetFinder and see all the shelters in your area. Here you will find a lot of nearby private shelters who will take a dog in need of medical care.
http://www.petfinder.com

If the dog is a recognizable breed, contact the breed rescue and see if they can help.

Also be sure to contact the municipal shelter and at least let them know you have the dog so it can be posted on their Website so the owner can find the dog.

My Dog Died While In Vets Care Just Went For Grooming Should I Contact An Attorney. My Puppy Only 2 Years Old ?
The Vet Said He Needed To Put My Dog Asleep Because He Is Not Friendly With Strangers. But The Problem Is Vet Didn't Put Him Too Sleep As He Promised, He Know My Puppy Behavior He Should Have Did What He Told Us His Death Was So Unnecessary...

Sounds like what you're saying is, they only intended to sedate him but he died unexpectedly.

Maybe you can sue him, sounds like they made a mistake. I wouldn't bother. Doesn't sound like something you could get much money for, and I don't think cases like this rate taking up a court's time.

It would be decent of the vet's office to compensate you for the cost of the puppy.

I Want To Become A Veterinarian?
I'M 15 A 10 Grader In High School And I Don'T Know When I Should Start To Worry About This But I Want To See If I Can Do Something Right Now. What Type Of Things Can I Do To Become Should I Call My Veterinarian Office To See If They Are Looking For Volunteers Or What?

If becoming a veterinarian is your goal you may want to visit the site below to learn more about that particular career choice. The article below describes the educational requirements.

http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos076.htm

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement About this section

Veterinarians must obtain a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree and a State license. Admission to veterinary school is competitive.

Education and training. Prospective veterinarians must graduate with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M. or V.M.D.) degree from a 4-year program at an accredited college of veterinary medicine. There are 28 colleges in 26 States that meet accreditation standards set by the Council on Education of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).

The prerequisites for admission to veterinary programs vary. Many programs do not require a bachelor's degree for entrance, but all require a significant number of credit hours—ranging from 45 to 90 semester hours—at the undergraduate level. However, most of the students admitted have completed an undergraduate program and earned a bachelor's degree. Applicants without a degree face a difficult task in gaining admittance.

Preveterinary courses should emphasize the sciences. Veterinary medical colleges typically require applicants to have taken classes in organic and inorganic chemistry, physics, biochemistry, general biology, animal biology, animal nutrition, genetics, vertebrate embryology, cellular biology, microbiology, zoology, and systemic physiology. Some programs require calculus; some require only statistics, college algebra and trigonometry, or pre-calculus. Most veterinary medical colleges also require some courses in English or literature, other humanities, and the social sciences. Increasingly, courses in general business management and career development have become a standard part of the curriculum to teach new graduates how to effectively run a practice.

In addition to satisfying preveterinary course requirements, applicants must submit test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT), or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), depending on the preference of the college to which they are applying. Currently, 22 schools require the GRE, 4 require the VCAT, and 2 accept the MCAT.

Admission to veterinary school is competitive. The number of accredited veterinary colleges has remained largely the same since 1983, but the number of applicants has risen significantly. Only about 1 in 3 applicants was accepted in 2007.

New graduates with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree may begin to practice veterinary medicine once they receive their license, but many new graduates choose to enter a 1-year internship. Interns receive a small salary but often find that their internship experience leads to better paying opportunities later, relative to those of other veterinarians. Veterinarians who then seek board certification also must complete a 3-year to 4-year residency program that provides intensive training in one of the 39 AVMA-recognized veterinary specialties including internal medicine, oncology, pathology, dentistry, nutrition, radiology, surgery, dermatology, anesthesiology, neurology, cardiology, ophthalmology, preventive medicine, and exotic-small-animal medicine.

Licensure. All States and the District of Columbia require that veterinarians be licensed before they can practice. The only exemptions are for veterinarians working for some Federal agencies and some State governments. Licensing is controlled by the States and is not uniform, although all States require the successful completion of the D.V.M. degree—or equivalent education—and a passing grade on a national board examination, the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam. This 8-hour examination consists of 360 multiple-choice questions covering all aspects of veterinary medicine as well as visual materials designed to test diagnostic skills.

Equine Veterinarian????
I Want To Be A Veterinarian When I'M Older And Specialize In Horses. How Do I Firstly Become A Vet And Then Specialize In Horses? I Know You Have To Go To University But Where Before And After That???? Please Help!

Becoming a veterinarian is VERY hard to do. You should start working/volunteering/shadowing a veterinarian ASAP!!!! It would be the best if you could do this for a mixed animal vet because even if you want to work with horses you need to work with everything first. You should also be focusing on your grades. You should be shooting for a state university, preferably one with a veterinary school. To become a vet you need 4 years of undergrad and 4 years of veterinary school. Veterinary school is THE toughest school to get into MUCH harder than medical school ever thought about being. There is only about 28 vet schools in the US and they only take AT MOST 100 students. The receive however THOUSANDS of applicants. Once you make it to a major university you need to be TOTALLY focused on your grades a 3.5 is considered low competitive but I have seen people with 4.0 turned down flat. You should be also getting as much experience as possible. Some vet schools require, some recommend highly (aka require), and soon most will follow in having experience of AT LEAST 100 hours in each of the following areas: Small animal, Large Animal, Research, and Exotic. This experience must be under veterinary supervision aka it can not be owning an animal, any stable work or research that is not headed by a vet. Remember becoming a veterinarian is truly a labor of love, the average salary is 60k for ALL areas of veterinary medicine however the average vet graduates with 105k in debt. There is usually little help to pay that debt off for small animal and equine students due to the popularity of the two. If you decide to specialize it depends in what ... surgery, lameness, radiography, internal medicine, etc... but it will require 2-4 and maybe more college ON TOP of vet school. This its self can be competitive in its own league since it is the best of the best competing for the spots. With a specialization you will work at a referral clinic, a highly specialized clinic, or at an university. You in most all of these settings will be working under others and will have to work your way up even with a specialization. You should not worry about that now that can wait til 3rd or 4th year of vet school. So in short remember 2 things EXPERIENCE and GRADES (A's).