Veterinary Clinic in Lake Havasu

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Veterinary Clinic in

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FAQ

Is Early Spay And Neuter For Cats Negative Like It Is For Dogs Too?
When Discussing Canine Spay/Neuter, It Is Best To Wait 6 Months To Even Over A Year Depending On The Size Of The Dog And When They Stop Growing. Is This True For Cats Also That It'S Best To Wait Until 6 Months Or They Can Have Growth Problems And Increases Of Cancer?

No, since cats don't reach that large size that dogs do, it's not an issue. In fact, the current thinking is with cats, the sooner the better. Females increase their risk of developing mammary cancer with each passing heat cycle. Females who are spayed prior to their first heat almost never get mammary cancer - it's generally fatal, or at best extremely expensive to treat. Females who are allowed to cycle in and out of heat are at risk for developing a deadly infection of the uterus called pyometra. With males, the big risk is that they develop spraying behaviors when they become sexually mature. Females can be spayed when they reach 2 1/2 pounds (about 10 weeks) and males when they reach 2 pounds (about 8 weeks). It's called a pediatric alter, and has been safely done (and recommended) in the US for over 20 years.

ETA - my remarks about females should have been "female cats". I have read up on the whole thing about dogs - and while cats and dogs are both mammals, there is where the similarity ends of course :)

Neutering Puppy?
How Will Neutering My 6 Month Odl Puppy Change Him? Obviously He Can'T Breed A Female Anymore, But Are There Any Personality Changes, Etc.??

Additionally to being a birth control method, neutering has health benefits. Uterine, ovarian, and testicular cancer are prevented, and hormone-driven diseases such as benign prostatic hypertrophy become a non-issue as well. Female cats and dogs are seven times more likely to develop mammary tumors if they are not spayed before their first heat cycle. [1] Unspayed dogs have a 25% chance of developing mammary tumors, about 50% of which are malignant. [citation needed] A dangerous common uterine infection known as pyometra is also prevented.

The procedures may also help to address behavioral issues that might otherwise result in animals being given up to shelters, abandoned, or euthanised

Obviously, most animals lose their libido due to the hormonal changes involved with both genders, and females no longer experience heat cycles, which may be a major nuisance factor, especially in female cats. Minor personality changes may occur in the animal. Neutering is often recommended in cases of undesirable behavior in dogs, although studies suggest that while roaming, urine marking, and mounting are reduced in neutered males, it has little effect on aggression and other important behavioral issues. Intact male cats are more prone to urine spraying, while many common behavioral causes of urine marking remain in castrated cats. Contrary to popular belief, neutered male cats are not more prone to urethral blockages than intact toms. A male cat's naturally longer, narrower urethra predispositions the animal for blockage whether it is neutered or not. Key factors in prevention include an increased fluid intake and a nutritious, minimally processed diet.[5]

Recent observational research by PAACT, The Professional Association of Applied Canine Trainers, suggests that spaying and neutering, though in many cases beneficial, may cause physiological and psychological problems if performed too early. PAACT claims that some dogs display paedomorphic tendencies, which may be related to early spaying and neutering PAACT. More clinical research is needed to verify these claims

Should I Have To Pay For This Emergency Vet Bill?
I Took My Chihuahua To The Vet Last Month And They Gave It The Lepto And A Couple Of Hours Later He Started Panting And Shaking. We Took It Back To The Same Vet And It Was After Hours So We Had To Pay For An Emergency. It Was 100 Dollars Plus The 160 Dollars That I Had To Pay For Both Of My Dogs To Get Their Shots A Couple Of Hours Before. I Called Different Vets And I Looked Online And It All Said That They Should Have Let Me Know That Chihuahuas Are Prone To Being Allergic To The Lepto Shot, If I Would Have Known That I Would Not Have Given It To Him. Later, When I Took Him In She Even Told Me That Chihuahuas Are Prone To This. I Dont Get Why She Didnt Tell Me When I Took Them In Before He Had The Allergic Reaction. Do You Think That I Should Have To Pay The $100 Dollar Emergency Bill?

No I don't think you have to pay for this Emergency Vet Bill. I think your vet messed up on this one and should have known that Lepto Vaccines and Chihuahuas do not mix. If you get your dog a vaccination or any kind of medication, the vet should tell you what side effects to expect and what to do if you run into an Emergency Situation like an Allergic Reaction. You should have been told of the side effects of the Lepto Vaccine and the vet, who should have known that Chihuahuas do react differently, than other breeds to the Lepto Vaccine and this vet should not have given it to your Chihuahua. When my Chihuahuas were all vaccinated, the Lepto Shot is the only shot my vet refused to give them, because of the Lepto Vaccine effects on Chihuahuas. Thankfully I never had to go through a dog having a reaction to Lepto because I have a good vet who knows what he's doing. Find another vet.

Do I Need An Emergency Vet?
My Cat Has Been Hiding Upstairs All Evening And Doesn'T Appear To Want Anyone To Go Near Her. When I Stroke Her Or Go To Pick Her Up She Growls At Me - She Is Usually So Loving - I Am Concerned That She Is In Pain. I Wanted To Check That She Is Eating And Drinking So I Took Her A Bowl Of Water And Some Tuna But She Has Ignored Both. I Tried To Get Her To Drink Some Water By Gently Patting Her Mouth With Water, She Was Sick Staright After. Also I Have Noticed That Her Ears Are Quite Cold. Do You Think I Should Take Her To The 24 Hour Vet?

You can phone your vet and describe the symptoms and they will decide from that if she needs an emergency vet-if they say she does then the insurance should cover it but if you decide to take her without being advised by a vet it's unlikely the insurance will pay the call out fee. It should tell you in the policy documents what you are covered for. I don't know what is wrong with her so it's hard to say if she needs emergency treatment or not-she certainly seems unhappy and probably in discomfort so I think if it was me I would take her in rather than leave her like that all night.

Veterinary Technician!?
I Wanna Be A Veterinary Technician For My Career And Was Wondering What Do I Need To Do In Order To Be A Vet Tech? Whats Are Some Good Online Schools For Veterinary Technician? Any Tips That I Can Do To Help Myself Would Be Awesome!

Veterinary technicians are required (in most states) to have a 2 year degree in veterinary technology from an AVMA accredited veterinary technology program, to have passed the Veterinary Technician National Exam and a state exam in order to be credentialed. They are also generally required to attend a set number of continuing education courses each year to keep up with changes in veterinary medicine.

There are more than 200 AVMA accredited veterinary technology programs in the US, with many of them offering degrees rather than just diploma's. If there isn't one near you, you can consider getting a degree from a distance-education program but you should understand that these are much better options for someone who has at least several months to years experience working in a veterinary facility as an assistant. The reason for this is that you have less access to instructors and other students when you do have questions and because in on-site programs you are start getting hands-on experience in the first semester. Distance education programs also require a rather large time commitment from your mentoring veterinarian or credentialed technician and it's hard to find someone who will be willing to make that commitment if you don't already have a relationship with them.

You can find a list of AVMA accredited veterinary technology programs through the AVMA website:
https://www.avma.org/ProfessionalDevelop...

Besides getting an associates degree, there are also opportunities for continuing on and earning a bachelors degree specifically in veterinary technology or choose to specialize in more than a dozen different areas including emergency and critical care, internal medicine, anesthesia, dentistry, behavior and equine nursing.

A very general list of things that a veterinary technician would do would include collecting patient histories, collect biological samples (blood, urine, feces, etc), running diagnostic tests, monitoring and medicating hospitalized animals, assisting in surgery, administering and monitoring anesthesia, performing dental cleanings, providing treatment for outpatients as prescribed by the attending veterinarian, filling prescriptions, answering client questions on preventative medicine, disease processes, medications, etc, maintaining inventory, caring for surgical and medical equipment such as anesthesia machines, taking radiographs, entering medical records, etc.

Before enrolling in a veterinary technology program, it is a good idea to volunteer or take a job at a veterinary hospital to see what the job of a veterinary technician really entails. Many people think that it will suit them but find out differently once they start school. Having personal experience in a veterinary facility will also help you to excel in your classes by giving you real-world application for what you are learning.

Also, contact your state veterinary technician association. They can give you detailed advice on the requirements for being a veterinary technician in your state and also help you to choose an appropriate school.

Information About Veterinary Technicians?
I Am Considering Being A Veterinary Technician Is A Few Years And I Have A Few Questions. How Much Would I Make? How Much Schooling Would I Need? What Does This Job Involve? Any Other Advice Would Be Helpful. I In High School And Am Considering This Career Path. Pros/Cons Etc. Thx!!!

Veterinary technicians are required (in most states) to have a 2 year degree in veterinary technology from an AVMA accredited veterinary technology program, to have passed the Veterinary Technician National Exam and a state exam in order to be credentialed. They are also generally required to attend a set number of continuing education courses each year to keep up with changes in veterinary medicine. Veterinary technicians are educated in veterinary anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, animal husbandry, surgical assisting, anesthesia, medical nursing, diagnostics such as radiology and ultrasonography, clinical pathology, parasitology, medical terminology and record keeping, biological collection and sample handling and preperation, etc. They can also specialize in areas such as emergency and critical care, internal medicine, anesthesia, dentistry, behavior and equine nursing.

The American Veterinary Medical Association maintains a list of accredited degree programs on their website: Inhttp://www.avma.org/education/cvea/vette...

In some states, the use of the title "veterinary technician" and the practice of veterinary technology is recognized as profession and licensure is required. In other states, veterinary technicians are registered or certified. The laws that govern veterinary technicians vary from state to state so for specific information on the laws a person should check their state veterinary practice act or contact their state veterinary licensing board.

The daily workload can vary greatly depending on the type of practice you work in and the area of the country you are in. Most often the workload will be variable in any practice--some days will be like a wild rollercoaster ride while others are so boring and slow that you have a hard time staying awake.

A very general list of things that a veterinary technician would do would include collecting patient histories, collect biological samples (blood, urine, feces, etc), running diagnostic tests, monitoring and medicating hospitalized animals, assisting in surgery, administering and monitoring anesthesia, performing dental cleanings, providing treatment for outpatients as prescribed by the attending veterinarian, filling prescriptions, answering client questions on preventative medicine, disease processes, medications, etc, maintaining inventory, caring for surgical and medical equipment such as anesthesia machines, taking radiographs, entering medical records, etc.

Pay and benefits generally are low and make it hard to get by. You have to really pick and choose your jobs in order to make a comfortable living. I was single and working as a "well-paid veterinary technician" for many years and still had a hard time just making ends meet. Licensed veterinary technicians average about $17 per hour, but you have to take into account the cost of living in the states where technicians are licensed. In states where licensure is not practiced the pay even for credentialed technicians is lower than that.

Before enrolling in a veterinary technology program, it is a good idea to volunteer or take a job at a veterinary hospital to see what the job of a veterinary technician really entails. Many people think that it will suit them but find out differently once they start school. Having personal experience in a veterinary facility will also help you to excel in your classes by giving you real-world application for what you are learning.

Also, contact your state veterinary technician association. They can give you detailed advice on the requirements for being a veterinary technician in your state and also help you to choose an appropriate school.