Veterinary Medicine in Lake Havasu

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Veterinary Medicine in

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FAQ

Career Questions About Veterinarians?
After Graduating From Vet School How Long Does It Take To Become A Veterinarian?

You finally have an edge on medical doctors after finishing school. Internship and residency isn't a requirement, you can become a practicing vet right out of school, but you can still choose to pursue them.

"For those veterinarians who wish to gain more experience or become board-certified in a specific field of medicine or surgery, they can go on to complete an internship and/or a residency in their chosen area of interest."

It's funny how it's actually easier to get into med school than vet school. I think the main reason is that there's so many more med schools, so it's more competitive.

Questions About A Veterinarian...?
Ok I Have A Few Questions.. 1. If I Were To Be A Veterinarian, What College Courses Do You Recommend For Me? 2. Are There Different Types Of Veterinarians...? 3. What Positions Of Jobs Could You Get At Your Local Vet.? Thanks To All Who Try To Help! (10 Points On The Line!)

1. The college courses required will depend on the vet school you are wanting to go to. It will be a lot of chemistry, biology, and physics as well as basics like english, social sciences, public speaking. It takes 4 years to get your bachelor's degree and then 4 years of vet school (not 8 like the previous answerer said). Go to the website of the vet school you're planning to attend and look up the required courses for admission that is what you'll need to take. In addition to those, you will need to choose a degree granting major. Biology, and animal science are popular because they overlap with the pre-vet requirements but it can be in anything.

2. There are many many types of veterinarians.
General practitioners are the ones that most people think of. They do routine care, such as vaccinations, routine surgeries, etc. They can be classified based on the type of animals they work on (small animal, large animal, mixed, exotics). Most of these vets did their 4 years of vet school and went straight into practice.
Then there are specialists. These would include radiologists, dermatologists, oncologists, surgeons, etc. These vets did a 1 year internship and a 3 year residency after finishing vet school and then passed an additional board exam in their specialty. Most of them are employeed by referal clinics, and universities and they aren't usually primary care doctors.
There are also vets that do research, teach, work for the army or the government. Many of the ones that teach and do research hold PhDs in addition to their DVMs.

Most vets will probably hire you for front office work or kennel work. Definitely mention you're looking into vet med as a career. If no one is hiring definitely see if you can shadow, because that will get you minimal experience (and hopefully lead to a job later). Practical veterinary experience is extremely important to vet schools during admissions so start that asap.

About How Much Is It For A Vet To Remove A Catheder?
I Had To Take My Cat To An Emergency Vet Overnight. They Found Out He'S A Blocked Tom Cat And Had To Put A Catheder In To Help Him Pass Urine. So Far What The Emergeny Vet Is Charging Is $1000. I Don'T Have Too Much More To Spend, About 500-800. But I Still Have To Take Him To A Vet In The Morning After I Pick Him Up From The Vet Hospital To Have The Catheder Removed And Possible Meds For Him. Im Really Stressed Out, Mentally, Financially, Physically. Im Worried I Wont Be Able To Pay, Or He'Ll Get Worse (So Far He'S Gotten Better, No Complications Yet.) Has Anyone Else Experienced This? How'D Things Go? How Was Your Kitty? What Do They Send Him Home With? Also, After He Gets Better And I Get My Finances Back In Order, I'M Getting Him Neutered.

An emergency vet is just that - to be used in emergencies, like the situation the original poster found their cat in last night. The emergency vet is generally more expensive than your regular vet. $1000 is pretty much on par to unblock a cat as it's an extremely lengthy, delicate procedure and they need to be monitored VERY closely afterwards - usually pretty near constantly as they recover, monitoring their ins (what's going in via IV) and outs (urine output via the catheter). Usually the cost ranges between $800 to $1500.

If they're able to take the catheter out today, they'll send him home with a special diet that you'll need to keep him on for the rest of his life, specifically formulated to maintain bladder health and prevent the crystals that caused the blockage in the first place from forming again. He'll also probably go home with pain medication and medication to prevent his urethra from spasming once they remove the catheter. It's up to the discretion of the vet, though, and there's usually some variation on what the vet wants to do based on his/her initial training, continuing education (all vets are required to earn a number of continuing education credits each year), and personal experience.

Prices vary from hospital to hospital. If all goes smoothly today and they're able to remove the catheter and send him home, it probably won't cost more than a couple hundred dollars, depending on how much food you pick up. Just be up front with your vet about where you stand financially.

Question About Emergency Vets?
What If You Don't Have An Emergency Vet In Your Area? What Would You Do If Your Vet Wasn't Open? Do You Think A Dog (Or Any Other Animal) Would Live Long Enough To Go To A Different City (1 Hour + ) To Visit A Emergency Vet?

Go down the yellow pages, and call all vet offices, until you find one that has an emergency number to call. A lot of times an emergency vet will walk you through what to do over the phone, unless he really needs to see it. We had to do that when my parents came to visit us with their Beagle, who got into rat poison my husband left out. They travelled 1500 miles for our wedding. No, we didn't shack up. Anyway, I called a 24 hour vet, and they told us what to do.

So what if you have to travel 1 hour or so to see the vet. If that means the dog won't die by morning, it was well worth the travel.

Is There A University/College Which Accepts Applicants For Veterinary Science Regardless Of Academic Results?
Bachelor Of Veterinary Science/Surgery Is A Blooming Hard Course To Get In, In Many Countries Like Australia... Just Wondering If There Are Universities Which Accept Students Based On Their Resume/Teachers Comments/Characters Etc. In A Hard Course Such As Medicine, Law Or Vet Science

No those are almost inaccessible careers nowadays you either have to be the best of the best there is or know someone in the business or you could spend years trying to get into law or vet school. (seriously don't take law) You can get into be a vet if you take one of those vet foundation courses and do really well but you'll have to go to a university that isn't known very well. The best thing to do would be to take a science like biology or biomedical even forensic science, There is a shortage of people taking them and so you can get into biomedical science with just a C in biology in some places! You could also use it to transfer into being a vet if you wanted to or go on into the world in one of the much needed science jobs of today.
Almost everyone can get into law at the moment its a dead end though really don't bother unless ur dad or something is a lawyer and is going to give you a training contract.

Would A Associate In Applied Science Degree In Veterinary Science Technology Help For Vet School?
The Community College Near Me Offers This Program, Http://Catalog.Sunyacc.Edu/Programs/Veterinary , I'M Trying To Go To Veterinarian School And Am Working Towards Finishing My Requirements For That. Would These Classes Help Me At All? Or Should I Just Stick To Taking The Pre-Reqs For Vet School.

That depends on the requirements of the veterinary school you plan to attend.

Some vet schools require that you have a bachelors degree ( typically doesn't matter the major) and have credits for a set of pre-requisite courses prior to application to vet school. If that is the case, a veterinary technology degree is not going to be beneficial unless you get a bachelors degree in veterinary technology and the vet school finds it acceptable. If they won't accept a bachelors degree in veterinary technology for application, then it is simply going to add 2 more years of time and tuition to an already long and expensive plan.

There are also some vet schools that don't require that you have a bachelor's degree for application to vet school so long as you have credits for their pre-requisite courses.

So you need to contact the vet school you are interested in directly and ask them about your goals and what their requirements are and what schools they will accept credits from. You can find a chart showing basic pre-requisites for many vet schools here: http://www.aavmc.org/data/files/vmcas/pr...
You may also purchase a book that lists the requirements for 47 vet schools all in one place:
http://www.aavmc.org/Publications/VMSAR....
But you would still want to call each school you are interested in to find out specifically about their acceptance of credits from particular undergrad schools.