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Fathers Rights in
93023, 93024
4 Methods To Help Your Lawyer Help You When you need a legal representative for any reason, you should work closely with them to be able to win your case. No matter how competent they are, they're likely to need your help. Listed here are four important methods to help your legal team assist you to win: 1. Be Totally Honest And Up Your lawyers need and expect your complete cooperation - regardless of what information you're planning to reveal in their mind. Privilege means what you say is saved in confidence, so don't hold anything back. Your legal team must know everything in advance - particularly information another side could discover and surprise you with later. 2. Provide Meticulous Records Keep a continuous and factual account of most information pertaining to your case. Whether it's witnesses or payments being made, provide your attorneys with the data they have to enable them to win. 3. Turn Up Early For Those Engagements Not be late when you're appearing before a court and get away from wasting the attorney's time, too, when you are promptly, each and every time. The truth is, because you may want to discuss eleventh hour details or even be extra ready for the case you're facing, it's a great idea to arrive early. 4. Demonstrate That You Have Your Act Together If you've been responsible for just about any crime, it's important to be able to prove to the court which you both regret the actions and they are making strides toward improving your life. As an example, if you're facing a DUI, volunteer for a rehab program. Be sincere and included in the cities the judge is presiding over. Working more closely with the legal team increases your odds of absolute success. Follow these tips, listen closely to how you're advised and ultimately, you must win your case.

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You'Ve Been Called In To Investigate A Construction Accident In Which The Cable Broke While A Crane Was Liftin
You'Ve Been Called In To Investigate A Construction Accident In Which The Cable Broke While A Crane Was Lifting A 4500 Container. The Steel Cable Is 2.0 In Diameter And Has A Safety Rating Of 50000 . The Crane Is Designed Not To Exceed Speeds Of 3.0 Or Accelerations Of 1.0 , And Your Tests Find That The Crane Is Not Defective. What Is Your Conclusion? Did The Crane Operator Recklessly Lift Too Heavy A Load? Or Was The Cable Defective?

neither is likely, but I would investigate the failure modes of the cable.

I Would Like To Expand On My Question Of , Can I Still Get Alimony After Being Divorced For 3 Yrs?
I Was Married For 24 Yrs. , I Was A Stay At Home Wife Taking Care Of Two Kids, Cooking And Cleaning. I Did Not Go To Work Until My Youngest Was 10. I Was A Good Wife And Mother, But I Fell Out Of Love With My Husband After 20 Yrs Of Marriage After He Admitted To Having A One Night Stand With A Friend Of Ours. I Did Not Work Since I Had Young Children. So I Stayed In The Marriage For Another 4 Yrs. But Things Got Worse And I Couldn'T Stay Any Longer. He Didn'T Want The Divorce But He Started It By Getting A Lawyer. I Was Stupid And Didn'T Get One. I Walked Away With A Trailer And My Car And Asked For No Alimony. I Let My Ex Keep The House Since It Was Near His Family. I Do Work And Have Worked For 10 Yrs. Now Making The Minimun Wage And Barely Making Ends Meet, While He Has A Good Paying Job. It Sounds Like I'M Just Plain Out Of Luck, But I'M Hoping That Something Can Be Changed.

Alimony, also called maintenance in some states, is money paid by one spouse to the other after a divorce for the purpose of support. Husbands as well as wives are sometimes appropriate candidates for alimony.

Mention of the word "alimony" often elicits strong emotional responses. In the past, before so many women worked outside the home, the husband was the one who paid, and he paid more if he was at fault in the divorce. Sometimes, if the wife was at fault, she was not granted alimony.

At the present time, a very small percentage of divorces or separations even involve the payment of alimony; of those that do, an even smaller number receive alimony for more than a brief period of time. Fault is no longer a factor in granting or limiting alimony in more than half of the states. Ask your mediator about the alimony situation in your state- in Texas, for example, you must be married for more than 10 years to receive alimony- as it's important to understand the factors considered in your specific situation.

Permanent alimony is generally reserved for an elderly, unskilled spouse and a marriage of lengthy duration, or the spouse of a wealthy person who would be totally unable to maintain the standard of living the wealthy spouse had been providing. Dolores worked with a couple, for example, where the wife had supported her older artist husband for many years. Although she wasn't wealthy, she earned four times her husband's income. In this case the wife agreed to pay long- term alimony.

If you successfully negotiate for any alimony, it will probably be rehabilitative - to be paid for a specific period of time so that you can develop a way to earn a satisfactory living or qualify for a promotion. The other option is temporary alimony, which is intended to compensate you for time spent in the past helping your spouse with his or her business or career, or in some circumstances, for time you will spend without full- time employment until your child reaches a certain age.

You will need to negotiate about whether you will receive any payments, and if so, how much and for how long. You will want to be sure there is enough money available, in accordance with the child support guidelines, for child support and child-related expenses before alimony is negotiated. Then the income and expenses of both you and your spouse must be considered to determine if alimony is appropriate. Take a realistic look at your personal financial situation, have a complete physical examination, and try to make the best possible assessment of your present and future needs, especially with regard to when and under what circumstances you can become self-sufficient. These considerations will help you negotiate for an appropriate amount of alimony.

You will probably want to include in your agreement some events which would result in the termination of alimony. For example: if circumstances change for the spouse who's paying, or if you remarry or live continuously with a lover who is contributing to the household income. See also question 4:Do alimony payments stop if I live with a new partner (cohabit) or remarry?

If you don't have alimony in your agreement, generally you can't add it once you're divorced, even if circumstances change. If, however, you are negotiating for alimony and you think circumstances may change, you can spell out terms for adjusting the payments in the future.

My Husband Was Injured Due To Faulty Airbag And Seatbelt Of His Toyota Tacoma. Legal Advice? Help?
He Is 30 Years Old And His Aorta( Largest Artery In The Body) Was Torn More Than 50 %. He Almost Died. God Is All That Saved Him, And Extremely Skilled Surgeons. We Have Three Children Who Almost Lost Their Daddy. Toyota Should Be Responsible For That Faulty Airbags That Did Not Deploy And The Seat Belt That Unlatched Causing Him To Be Ejected From His Truck. Any Ideas Legal Advice Or Suggestions Are Welcome! Have A Happy Holiday And Always Tell Those Close To You How Much You Love Them. He Was On His Way To Work. That Was The Last Thing I Said To Him As He Left. It Could Have Been The Last Thing He Heard. God Bless.

Legal representation is your best course of action. If you can't afford one, contact legal aid in your area. I didn't see what state you were in, but we are in upstate NY and our company does investigations for cases just like this.
As mentioned in a previous response, KEEP THE TRUCK for investigation and inspection purposes. It will be critical to your case!
Please feel free to contact me through our website & we can discuss things more privately and in further detail. I am not soliciting business, but offering my professional opinion in your best interest.
http://www.airbagsolutions.com
I hope your husband and your family recover soon and well. I'm sorry for your pain.

How To Become A Lawyer?
What Is The Process? - How Many Years In University, Law School, Etc? - What Attributes Do You Need To Become A Good Lawyer?

I'm assuming this is in the U.S.

The first step is you need to get at least a Bachelor's degree (undergrad), which usually takes 4-5 years. Some people graduate as quickly as 3 years if they go in with a lot of credit credit from taking AP or IB tests, but it typically takes 4-5 years.

The second step is law school. That takes 3 years, but some part-time programs spread it out over 5 or 6 years. You're required to complete your law degree in 6 years by most states, though.

The third step is the Bar Exam. This varies from state to state, but it lasts two or three days and takes about 3 months of full-time study to get ready for. Unless you plan to take the CPA or CFA exams at some point, it will be the hardest and most exhausting exam of your life.

What makes a good lawyer depends on what type of practice you do, but generally speaking you need to be able to create and break down arguments, think critically, write persuasively, and do thorough research. Trial attorneys need to be able to speak well, and transactional attorneys need exceptional attention to minute details. You also need to have a substantial measure of determination and fortitude. The process of becoming a lawyer is long and difficult, and you will feel ready to quit at several points along the way. Knowing why you're doing it and getting your mind right at the outset will help you push through it. Practice itself is both rewarding and frustrating, so continuing in your career will also take no small amount of perseverance.

I think you're a woman, so here's some advice as you start down this arduous path: Dress and act professionally at every point of your education and career. It's ok to be "cute," but you need to learn to distinguish a cute outfit that's suitable for going out with friends and a cute outfit that's suitable for the office and the courtroom. I've seen and heard of women lawyers being kicked out of courtrooms because they dressed a little too slutty for the judge's tastes. Don't make that mistake. Also, most legal communities are tight-knit, so if you're a little too cavalier in college or law school, your colleagues will know about it. Guard your reputation like a priceless diamond. It is everything in our profession.

Would You Get A Lawyer If You Get Hurt Seriously On The Job?
My Husband Completely Shattered His Ankle. Now He Needs Pins And Plates In His Leg. I Know Each State Varies On Laws And Regulations. What Would You Do? And Besides That The Company Has Laid Off Most Of Their Nurse Case Managers And Now He Just Had A Case Manager. Is This Normal For A Serious Type Of Injury? He Has To Have An Ankle Replacement. We Live In The State Of Arizona.

I would go to a legal directory and contact maybe a dozen lawyers. Find some that offer free consultations and use the free consultation from each lawyer to get more information. This way you can get the opinion of multiple attorneys for free, and by the time you finish with the 3rd or 4th lawyer you will have a great idea of your options and what you should do. I know employers treat this kind of situation carefully but almost always try to screw you (in my opinion). You can use this free legal directory to find lawyers in Arizona http://www.aplawyers.com/c/10/Attorneys/Arizona/

Wisconsin Family Court Question Primary Placement?
I Could Give A Lot Of Detail Here But In An Effort To Keep It Simple I Will Just Talk About The Basics. My Ex And I Divorced In 2005, At That Time I Had Agreed For My Son To Live With Her Because I Believed It Would Be Better For Him To Remain With His Half Brother. (She Had A Child From Previous Relations) She Married The Guy She Was Cheating With Barely 6 Mos After Our Divorce. In Short The Guy Is A Terrible Provider. My Son Moved About 5 Times And Probably Went To 5 Different Schools During The Time He Was With Her. This Was Due To Her Dumb *** Husband Not Being Able To Hold A Job And Pay The Bills. In October Of 2009 He Left The State To &Quot;Look Into A Job&Quot; He Took Off To Arizona With Her Having Little Knowledge Of It. She Was Then Evicted From There Rented Property For Rent Not Paid. She Was Basically Homeless With 4 Kids. (She Had 2 More With Him). She Basically Ended Up Staying With Friends For Nearly 6 Mos. To Her Credit She Agreed To A Stipulated Change Of Placement, Changing Primary Placement To Me. (For My Son) In About February Of 2010 She Went To Live In Arizona. For Some Time They Literally Were Living In A Camper. Her Husband Went Through Many Jobs Until In The Summer Of 2011 They Put What They Could In There Car Leaving Everything Else Behind Including A Couple Dogs, And Left In The Middle Of The Night For Wisconsin. Supposedly He Could Not Find Work In Az. Once Back In Wisconsin He Never Found Work Either. In Short They Spent 3 Mos Shacking Up With Friends Before Once Again They Took Off Back To Arizona Because He Supposedly Had A Job Offer. (Just Some Info On The Jack***, He Wont Do Anything That Doesn'T Involve Driving.) Turns Out He Ended Up Driving A Taxi When They Got Back. In Any Case To My Knowledge They Are Now Living In A 2 Bedroom Trailer Home (2 Adults And 3 Kids). Now She Seems To Be Telling My Son She Wants To Get Him Down There Over The Summer. Right Before They Decided To Come Back In 2011 I Was Almost Going To Make Arrangements But It Is Very Obvious To Me There Is No Stability There. Somehow Or Another They Are Now Running Some Sort Of Taxi Service. Knowing Her Husband He Is Probably Doing It Illegally. Like I Said Before He Wont Do Anything That Doesn'T Involve Driving. Id Would Almost Bet That They Will Crash And Burn Before Too Long. Getting To The Point Here, When We Divorced We Never Had An Actual Visitation Agreement Or Order. It Was Simply Reasonable Time And Notice. That Always Worked Fine When She Was In Wisconsin But 2000 Miles Away Doesn'T Make That So Workable. When We Signed The Stipulated Change Of Placement No Visitation Agreement Was Put Into Place. I Would Also Ad That She Has Paid Me No Child Support Since He Came To Live With Me. The Reason Why Is I Did Not Ask For It, She Was Basically Homeless At The Time And Had 3 Other Kids To Care For. I Am A Person Who Believed Just Cause Something Is Legal To Do Doesnt Make It Morally Corect. To This Day However She Has Not Even Made An Offer To Pay Support. In Fact She Sent My Son A Birthday Card This Year With $20.00 And It Was The Only Thing He Has Ever Really Gotten From Her. Bottome Line Here Is I Dont Feel It Is A Safe Enviroment For My Son To Be In Down There. I Have Also Had Him In Counseling Where He Had Told The Counselor About Her Husband Being Physically Abusive To Him. Another Reason I Dont Want Him There. I Am Also Quite Sure That If She Got Him There That In August When He Would Have To Come Back That She Would Claim To Not Have The Money To Send Him Back And Try To Put Him In School Down There. I Know Ive Gave A Lot Of Info Here But Ultimately My Question Is Do Have A Legal Standing O Prevent Him From Going There? Again We Do No Have A Visitation Order So I Would Assume There Is Nothing She Could Try And Inforce. I Would Also Assume She Would Have To File In Wisconsin Court To Get A Visitation Order And Then Get It Inforced. This Is A Rough Situation For Me, I Wan My Son To Be In Contact With His Mother But I Feel She Should Come Up To See Him Given The Situation. Even With That I Am A Little Worried That If She Came Up That She Wouldnt Try To Take Off With Him. I Would Assume Though That Would Be Kidnapping Under Law Because I Have Primary Placement. At The Least It Would Be Interfering With A Placement Order. I Know This Is Long But If Anyone Could Give Me Some Factual Information I Would Greatly Apreciate It. If Anyone Has Further Questions, Ill Do My Best To Answer Them. Thanks In Advance.

he court that has jurisdiction is Wisconsin because that is where the child resides. She should have contacted you about visitation first (your agreement is reasonable time and reasonable notice) instead of going to your son and making an assumption that it was okay for him to spend the summer in Arizona. That put your son in a situation that he should have never been put in and the courts won't like that. I assume that you've never disagreed on visitation before which is really amazing so this is new ground for you.

You have every right to talk to her and negotiate. She has no order in place stating that she can just pick up the kid and take him to another state. She made the choice to move away from him.

I would recommend that you talk to her and negotiate with her first if at all possible, explain to her your concerns and tell her you would be willing to allow her to see your son but she needs to come to Wisconsin. (She has friends she can stay with). I would also involve the boy's counselor if he is still seeing a therapist to get her professional opinion on what is in the best interest of the child.

If she just decides to take the child and keep him in Arizona I don't believe it would be considered kidnapping since it is not clear who has legal custody of the child. If you had sole custody, yes, but it sounds like you two just agreed the boy would live with you. I assume that you then have joint custody so she has a legal right to make decisions on his behalf too.

If I were in your position, after I spoke to my ex and tried to resolve it between us, I would initiate a modification of your custody agreement to include a visitation plan based on a substantial change in circumstances such as being in your primary custody and her move so far away. Get something in writing. You can bring up the issue of child support if you want. You can even threaten her that this will be the next step if she doesn't agree to your terms (but I wouldn't recommend it).

You have a strong case for keeping the boy in Wisconsin. Courts don't like to move kids around. You can clearly give him more stability. She should have visitation but it should be in writing so you can take her to court if the boy is abused or if she refuses to return him.