The Best Ten
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Legal Service in
93401, 93402, 93403, 93405, 93406, 93407, 93408, 93409, 93410, 93412
4 Methods To Help Your Lawyer Allow You To When you need a legal representative for any reason, you should work closely along with them in order to win your case. Regardless how competent these are, they're likely to need your help. Here are four important ways to help your legal team assist you to win: 1. Be Totally Honest Or Higher Your lawyers need and expect your complete cooperation - regardless of what information you're going to reveal in their mind. Privilege means what you say is stored in confidence, so don't hold anything back. Your legal team should know all things in advance - most importantly information the other side could discover and surprise you with later. 2. Provide Meticulous Records Keep a regular and factual account of all the information related to your case. Whether it's witnesses or payments being made, provide your attorneys with all the current data they need to help them to win. 3. Show Up Early For All Engagements Never be late when you're appearing before a court and get away from wasting the attorney's time, too, by being on time, every time. In reality, because you may need to discuss eleventh hour details or perhaps be extra prepared for the truth you're facing, it's smart to arrive early. 4. Demonstrate That You Have Your Act Together If you've been charged with any sort of crime, it's important in order to convince a legal court that you simply both regret the actions and so are making strides toward improving your life. As an example, if you're facing a DUI, volunteer for any rehab program. Be sincere and linked to the cities the judge is presiding over. Working more closely along with your legal team increases your likelihood of absolute success. Follow these tips, listen closely to how you're advised and ultimately, you ought to win your case.

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Collection Agency Pretend To Be Law Firms?
Do Collection Agency'S Pretend To Be Law Firms To Scare You Into Paying Them With The Threat Of Legal Action? How Much Do You Think You Would Have To Owe Before They Try To Get A Judgement Against You?

Regarding law suits...

You might be able to sue someone in a state you don't live and get a judgment, but that judgment would be thrown out almost immediately. You can't sue someone in a county where they don't live. The law allows you to defend yourself. If you live in Boston, and you are sued in LA for an old credit card debt, it doesn't make sense. Proper service of the complaint is a requirement for a law suit. And most states require that the suit be served in person, often by a process server or a member of the sheriff's office in the county where you live. LA County Sheriff's office isn't going to go all the way to Boston to serve a law suit for a civil action. If proper service is not done, that is grounds for a judgment to be overturned. A collection agency would be stupid to sue you in a county where you don't live. Also, it's a requirement of the FDCPA that you are sued where you live or, if a house is involved, where the house is located.

If a collection agency pretends to be a lawyer or a law firm, they are violating the law -- go and read the FDCPA - Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

I was sued by a collection agency. Before the case even went to court, the lawyer had racked up $1200 in fees. In the end, they got nothing. Most law suits are filed to scare people into paying something. When that doesn't work, they will tend to take you to court because they assume you can't afford a lawyer. With the lawyer who racked up $1200 in fees...once I started to fight back, they just gave up because they knew that in the end, it wasn't worth it. In many states, legal fees are not automatically paid to the victor -- a judge must decide that.

Also, consider wage garnishment. If it is allowed in your state (it is disallowed in NC, FL, TX and PA), then they are more likely to sue. However, there are limits to garnishment, and certain types of money can't be garnished - like disability and Social Security.

Don't assume because the amount is small that you are free from being sued. People are greedy by nature, and you just don't know. If you are swimming that much in debt, you might want to consider bankruptcy, but everyone's situation is different.

Remember, judgments must be earned. As long as you file your papers on time and go to court, there's always a chance to avoid a judgment. Don't assume that you will automatically lose. The burden of proof rests solely with the person/collection agency who sues you.

Good luck.

If You Win A Wrongful Death Suit Can The Other People Turn Around And File Bankruptcy So They Won'T Have To Pa
We Are Not Sure What To Do. Our Daughter Was Killed In A Car Accident And The Insurance Company Wants Us To Settle For A Small Amount And Sign Saying We Will Not Sue For Wrongful Death

hmm. well, yes, if they don't have the money to pay you and if they have other creditors, they'll probably file bankruptcy and they are allowed to do that. But I think they have to be in such a bad financial state that they would qualify for bankruptcy first.

I feel like their insurance would have to pay the full amount of their policy regardless of their bankruptcy. But if their policy isn't for very much money, then a lawsuit might not be worth it. But you can get a lot for wrongful death ordinarily.

I wouldn't sign any agreement with the insurance until you talk to a lawyer. It's hard for me to say what to do because I don't know how much money the other people actually have or what their insurance can pay or what they did to cause the car accident. If it's really a straightforward wrongful death case that you should definately win, if you get a lawyer and threaten with a lawsuit, you should be able to push the insurance to pay more than what they're offering now. But again, if they don't have any money, you can't get any money. And if the suit goes to trial, it's going to be more expensive than settling which might make it less worth the lawsuit. So talk to a lawyer and find out how much the other people have and how much the insurance can pay and how much the attorneys fees would be (maybe just a percentage of whatever you win) and talk about how likely your case is to win so that you can consider the amount that you can get in a settlement.

I feel like the insurance is probably pushing for an early settlement so that you agree that you won't sue before you find out how much you should really get, and once you agree not to sue, you can't. So talk to a lawyer FIRST! Or at least tell the insurance that their offer is not enough.

I'm really sorry about your daughter and I'm sorry that I can't offer any better advice. It has to be your decision and you're the only people who are in the position with all the information to make that decision.

Information On A Navy Jag Officer/Lawyer?
My Boyfriend Wants To Go Into The Navy To Become A Lawyer, I Can'T Find Any Information On It... What Would The Daily Schedule Be Like? When We'Re Married, Will I See Him Every Day? Will I Sleep Next To Him Every Night? What Is The Traveling Like? Please Help.

If he's already a lawyer, see the first link below. If he is not a lawyer now, he will have to enter the Navy as an officer (which requires a Bachelor's degree) and then serve a minimum of two years and apply and qualify before the Navy will send him to law school (Legal Education Program - second link below). During that time the Navy WILL send him to sea and he will be gone about 50% of nights during his first two or three years; normally that will be one in four nights when his ship is in homeport and six months at at a time when he is deployed. Then while he's in law school you'll see him every day and night, but once he's done, as a JAG Officer he will deploy again, normally two six month deployments in a two to three year sea tour, followed by a three year shore tour. Shore tours could be in the U.S. but could also be overseas--but as long as you're married, odds are you'll go with him. Day to day routine on shore duty is much like any other lawyer, with a higher likelihood of occasional travel. BTW, don't draw ANY conclusions from the TV series JAG because it has no relationship to real-life JAG officers. He will make less money and work harder than 90% of his law school classmates, but you may find that he loves the job and he may even stick around for a career. A Navy career is neither good nor bad, it's just different; like anything there are both good and bad aspects to it. I believe--as my career JAG friends do--that the good far outweighs the bad.

Need Help With Child Custody Case.?
My Husbands Ex Recently Filed For Primary Custody In March. She Waited A Year After They Broke It Off And He Moved Out. She Stated She Wanted Something In Writing About Visitation And Said She Didn'T Want Money. We Went To Mediation, She Refused To Work With Anything, Then Dismissed The Case. Our Attorney Advised Us He'D Never Seen This Tactic But We Refiled Anyway. Then She Filed A Sexual Abuse Charge Against Him A Month And A Half Ago. It Was Unfounded 3 Weeks Ago But She Still Refuses To Let Him See His Daughters. There Was An Abuse Case Filed Against Her Boyfriend In Which Was Also Unfounded. The Problem With That Is, We Have Proof That He Abuses Her. We Have Pictures, The 4 Yr Old Being Recorded Advising Of The Abuse, And We Have Affidavits From Witnesses Who Have Been In The House And Seen What Goes On. Dhs Refused To See That Proof And Dismissed It Just Because The 4 Yr Old Told Them, While Being Coached, That She Was Happy And Not Getting Hit. It Has Been 5 Weeks Since He Has Seen His Daughters And This Weekend Will Make 6. She Claims She Is Waiting On A Phone Call But Refuses To Tell Us What About Or Why. I Have Assumed It Was A Call From The Dhs Worker So I Called Her And Left Her Messages To Please Call My Husband'S Ex So That He Can See His Girls. Our Attorney Sent Her Attorney A Letter Today Advising Her Of The Issue. What Can He Do? There'S Is Nothing In Writing Yet. She Hates My Guts Only Because I Am With Him. I Treat My Step Daughters Better Then Their Mother Does. My Husband Is A Stay At Home Dad But She Would Never Take Advantage Of That. She Would Rather Have Them Stay With A Sitter While She Goes Out To Party Then Let Their Father Spend Anymore Time With Them Then She Feels He Should Be Allowed. She Even Stated To Him That She Thinks 4 Days A Month Is Fair. I Am So Frustrated With Her.

You don't need help with a custody case, you need a divorce.
This is not your custody case, these are not your children and never will be but you'll pay for it in more ways than one.
You're willfully holding a poisonous snake and you're mad at the snake.
Drop it and run for your life.

I Live In Nyc And I Am Looking For The Best Criminal Lawyer.?
Criminal Lawyer

If you are looking for the best, it will be very, very expensive. The best way to find a lawyer is by talking to friends and acquaintances. Since you want the best, ask some of your extremely rich friends if they know anyone good.

How Many Hours A Week Do Lawyers Work?
I Heard Conflicting Statements, Ranging From 40 To 70+ Hours A Week. I Also Read That You Start Out Working Many Hours But Then You Work Less And Get Paid More After A Few Years. Also, How Many Hours Do Specific Lawyers Work, Such As Corporate, Intellectual Property Etc.

As someone who just graduated from law school and who actually wrote an essay on this topic, I have a bit of perspective on this. However, while you should never use this as an answer on a law school exam, the answer to this question truly is "it depends."

Lawyers who work in big cities [especially New York, Chicago, LA, and DC] will work significantly more than lawyers in more rural areas.

As you pointed out, younger lawyers tend to work more than older lawyers.

Specialty isn't really much of a factor in how many hours you will work as an attorney, but what sector you work in really will. Attorneys that work in large law firms work the longest hours, medium to small sized firms come next, then non-profits, and finally government workers. However, government workers will make significantly less money than those that work at firms.

Firms typically require you to bill a quota of hours to clients each year. However, not every hour that you are at work is a "billable hour". On average, for every two hours billed, an attorney will spend another hour at work doing non-billable tasks. To get an idea of workloads for young New York attorneys, on average they bill 2200 hours a year. If you add in non-billable hours worked and average that out over a week, that means you'd be working 66 hour weeks with two weeks vacation each year. Keep in mind that this is average, so that means that half of young lawyers in New York are actually working even more than that. I don't know about you, but that sounds unbearable to me.

Plus when you work in a firm, the firm also wants you to spend your free time finding clients/having drinks with clients you already possess/making connections, etc., and therefore, you basically never have any time off. These sorts of activities are not counted into the above.

Now, if you work for the government, most of the time you will truly only work 40 hours a week, and they will not ask you to do anything outside of your job description.

Medium sized firms can rate anywhere in between big firms and government jobs. When I was on interviews, medium sized firms were asking that you bill anywhere between 1400 to 1800 hours minimum. This would work out to 42 hours and 54 hours a week, respectively. Although, keep in mind that the minimum that they want you to work will most likely keep your job, but if you want to advance, in most situations they'll want you to work more than that.

Keep in mind the big paycheck difference. At big firms lawyers can start right out of law school making upwards of $150,000 whereas the federal government only starts you at $54,000 and state governments can pay as little as $30,000 for some positions [such as being a public defender].

As for your experience determining how many hours you work per week - on average, you have to work at a firm for 7 years before it will significantly decrease. At that time, the firm will either decide to make you a partner in which case you will be able to cut down on your work time and still be rich, or the firm will not make you a partner, in which case you'll most likely quit and feel like you've just wasted 7 years of your life.

Hope this info. helps!