The Best 10
Personal Injury in San Luis Obispo

Home | Main Page | Advertise With Us | Sitemap


Personal Injury in
93401, 93402, 93403, 93405, 93406, 93407, 93408, 93409, 93410, 93412
4 Strategies To Help Your Lawyer Help You When you want a legal professional for any reason, you have to work closely along with them so that you can win your case. Irrespective of how competent they may be, they're planning to need your help. Here are four important approaches to help your legal team assist you to win: 1. Be Totally Honest And Up Your lawyers need and expect your complete cooperation - regardless of what information you're likely to reveal in their mind. Privilege means everything you say is held in confidence, so don't hold anything back. Your legal team has to know all things in advance - most importantly information the other side could check out and surprise you with later. 2. Provide Meticulous Records Keep a regular and factual account of all the information associated with your case. Whether it's witnesses or payments being made, provide your attorneys because of the data they must help them win. 3. Appear Early For All Those Engagements Never be late when you're appearing before a court and get away from wasting the attorney's time, too, by being punctually, every time. In reality, because you may want to discuss last minute details or perhaps be extra ready for the situation you're facing, it's smart to arrive early. 4. Demonstrate You Have Your Act Together If you've been arrested for any kind of crime, it's important so that you can prove to a legal court that you just both regret the actions and they are making strides toward enhancing your life. By way of example, if you're facing driving under the influence, volunteer to get a rehab program. Be sincere and linked to the neighborhood the judge is presiding over. Working more closely with your legal team increases your likelihood of absolute success. Try these tips, listen closely to how you're advised and ultimately, you should win your case.

ACTIONPages is your local directory publisher. Serving markets in Arizona, California, Washington, and Canada. ACTIONPages the best local choice for cost-effective advertising.
Some of the cites we server are, California Grover Beach | Pismo Beach | Nipomo | Arroyo Grande | San Luis Obispo | SLO | Morro Bay | Los Osos Orcutt Ojai Arizona | Lake Havasu | Kingman | Bullhead | Prescott | Payson | Show Low | Snowflake | Taylor | Flagstaff Sedona | Cottonwood | Camp Verde | Williams | Washington | Skagit | Whatcom | Bellingham | Ferndale Lynden Mount Vernon | Sedro Woolley | Burlington | Oak Harbor | Anacortes | Camano Island | Stanwood | Arlington Langley Clinton | San Juan Islands | BC | Duncan | Port Alberni | Comox | Courtney | Campbell River | Parksville | Langley Maple ridge | Chilliwack | Abbotsford | Mission | Whistler | Squamish | Sunshine Coast | Terrace | Kitimat | Smithers Prince Rupert | Prince George | Williams Lake | Quesnel | Sidney | Victoria | Alberta | Red Deer | Lloydminster | Ontario | Sudbury | Sault Ste Marie | North Bay | Timmins | Muskoka | Gravenhurst | Parry Sound | Huntsville | Kingston | Belleville | Cornwall | Brockville | Dundas | Pembroke | Renfrew | Smith Falls | Cobourg

Grandparents Rights?
I Want To Find Out What Rights A Grandparent Has. My Son And His Girlfriend Had A Baby. She Did Not Put My Son On The Birth Certificate, We Know He'S The Father. The Mom Stopped Letting My Son And The Rest Of The Family See The Baby Who Is Now 8 Months Old. I Would Like To Have A Visitation Schedule, Now That She Is Old Enough To Be Away From Her Mother For A Few Hours. Any Low Cost Suggestions?

First thing you need to do is establish paternity.

Get a court order for a paternity test. Then have the courts set visitation schedules. No one can keep your son from seeing his child.

You need to go to court it looks like and get some court orders.

Check with your local legal aid society. They provide low cost and in many cases no cost legal aid.

Good luck!

EDIT: Those folks that say grandparents DON'T have rights are WRONG: see below:

Grandparents in every state in the United States have rights, in some circumstances, to be awarded CUSTODY of their grandchildren or to be awarded court-mandated visitation with their grandchildren. Grandparents' rights are not constitutional in nature, nor did they exist at COMMON LAW. Recognition of grandparents' rights by state legislatures is a fairly recent trend, and most of the statutes have been in effect for less than 35 years.

Federal legislation may affect grandparents' rights, though these rights are based primarily on state law. Congress passed the Parental KIDNAPPING Prevention Act in 1980, which requires that each state give full faith and credit to CHILD CUSTODY decrees from other states. Federal legislation passed in 1998 also requires that courts in each state recognize and enforce grandparental visitation orders from courts in other states. All states have adopted a version of the Uniform Child Custody JURISDICTION and Enforcement Act ([UCCJEA] previously the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Act), which requires courts in the state where a child resides to recognize and enforce valid child custody orders from another state. Though the UCCJEA is not a federal STATUTE, the provisions of this uniform law as adopted in each state are similar.

A number of courts have recently determined that state statutes providing visitation to grandparents are unconstitutional. The United States Supreme Court in the 2000 case of Troxel v. Granville determined that the Washington visitation statute violated the due process rights of parents to raise their children. This case and similar decisions by state courts have caused several state legislatures to consider bills that would modify or completely revise the visitation rights in those states. Grandparents who seek to attain visitation rights should check the current status of state legislation in their respective states.

Factors Considered for Custody or Visitation
Courts grant visitation or custody to grandparents only when certain conditions provided in the state statutes are met. Conditions for a grandparent to attain custody differ from those conditions required for visitation rights. A grandparent should be familiar with the conditions for either custody or visitation before determining whether to file a petition to request either from a court of law.

Best Interests of the Child
Courts in every jurisdiction must consider the "best interests of the child" when granting custody or visitation rights to a grandparent. In some states, the relevant statute provides a list of factors the court should considered when determining a child's best interests. Other states do not provide factors in the statute, but courts in those states have likely identified factors in custody and visitation cases interpreting the state statutes.

The following factors in determining the best interests of the child are among those included in state statutes and CASE LAW:

The needs of the child, including considerations of physical and emotional health of the child, the safety of the child, and the welfare of the child
The capability of the parents and/or grandparents to meet the needs of the child
The wishes of the parent(s) and the grand-parent(s)
The wishes of the child, if the child is capable of making decisions for himself or herself
The strength of the relationship between the grandparent(s) and grandchild
The length of the relationship between the grandparent(s) and grandchild
EVIDENCE of abuse or neglect by the parent(s) or grandparent(s)
Evidence of substance abuse by the parent(s) or grandparent(s)
The child's adjustment to the home, school, or community
The ability of the parent(s) or grandparent(s) to provide love, affection, and contact with the child
The distance between the child and the parent(s) or grandparent(s)
Requirements for Awarding Custody to Grandparents
STATUTORY provisions for child custody (termed "conservatorship" in a few states) are usually less specific than the statutes regarding grandparent visitation. Courts must first consider the relationship of the parent or parents with the child before considering whether granting custody to grandparent(s) is appropriate. Several states specifically include consideration of grandparents as custodians if both parents are deceased. If either or both parents are alive, courts in most states will presume that the parent of the child should retain custody. Grandparents must generally prove the parent(s) unfit in order to overcome the judicial presumption in favor of the parent. Even if the relationship between the grandparent and grandchild is strong, it is very difficult for a grandparent to attain custody of a grandchild against the wishes of the parent or parents.

Requirements for Awarding Visitation to Grandparents
State statutes providing visitation to grandparents generally require that a number of conditions occur before visitation rights can be granted. The marital status of the parents must be considered in a majority of states before a court will evaluate the relevant factors to determine if visitation is appropriate. In some of these states, the parents' marital status is considered only if the grandparent or grandparents have been denied visitation by the parents. In other states, marital status is considered only if the grandchild resided with the grandparents for a certain length of time.

A minority of states require that at least one parent is deceased before a court can award visitation to the parent of the deceased parent of the child. For example, a maternal grandparent in one of these states may be awarded visitation only if the mother of the child is deceased.

State statutes vary in their treatment of cases in which a grandchild has been adopted. In several states, ADOPTION by anyone, including a stepparent or another grandparent, terminates the visitation rights of the grandparent. In some states, adoption by a stepparent or another grandparent does not terminate visitation rights, but adoption by anyone else does terminate these rights. In other states, adoption has no effect on the visitation rights of grandparents, so long as other statutory requirements are met.

Once the statutory conditions for visitation are met, grandparents must establish the factors that courts may or must consider to grant visitation rights. In every state, grandparents must prove that granting visitation to the grandchild is in the best interest of the child. Several states also require that the court consider the prior relationship between the grandparent and the grandchild, the effect grandparental visitation will have on the relationship between the parent and child, and/or a showing of harm to the grandchild if visitation is not allowed.

Courts' Jurisdiction over Custody and Visitation Cases
Parties Residing in the Same State
Each state provides the appropriate venue which can make custody and visitation determinations in a case where all of the parties reside in the same state. Where a DIVORCE is pending, the appropriate venue for making a custody or visitation decision involving the grandparents and grandchildren is almost always the court HEARING the divorce proceedings. Some states require visitation petitions to be filed with another domestic relations suit. Some states also permit visitation requests after a domestic relations order has been rendered or as an original proceeding.

Parties Residing in Different States
If a child's parents and/or grandparents live in different states, one of several laws will determine the appropriate court to hear a custody or visitation case. If a valid custody or visitation DECREE has been entered in one state, the Parental Kidnapping Prevention Act requires that another state must enforce and must not modify the decree. Another state may modify the decree only if the original state no longer has jurisdiction over the case or has declined jurisdiction to modify the custody or visitation decree. Congress amended this statute in 1998 to include a grandparent in the definition of "contestant."

If no state has made a valid custody determination, the provisions of the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act, as adopted by each state, will apply. A court in a particular state has power to hear a custody case if that state is the child's "home state" or has been the home state of the child within six months of the date the legal action was brought and at least one parent continues to reside in the state. Other situations include those in which a state with jurisdiction over a custody case declines jurisdiction or no other state may assert jurisdiction over the child.

Top Dui Lawyer Orange County?

Best advice is to ask a local attorney who does DUI defense only! Most will NOT charge for a first visit.

Can An Attorney Pay A Referral Fee To You For Referring Someone To Them?
Just Wondering If Attorneys Can Pay Referral Fees For Stuff Like Bankruptcies. I'D Imagine It Would Vary By State. Any Insight Would Be Appreciated.

Correct; it depends on the State. In California it is illegal for an attorney to pay a referral fee to a nonattorney.

Nearly all consumer bankruptcy attorneys offer free consultations. Take advantage of this to meet with one and get advice based on all of the details of your particular situation. You can find a referral at (National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys).

Where Do I Go To Get A Good Medical Malpractice Attorney?
I Busted My Thumb Driving A Few Months Ago, An Orthopaedic Surgeon Was Recommended To Me And He Thought My Best Option Was To Undergo Surgery. Now My Thumb Is Even Worse Than It Ever Was And I Can'T Work. Where Should I Go To Get Some Help To Deal With My Financial Problems?

First you need to find another ortho surgeon who will certify that your problem is due to medical malpractice. Then you need to find a medical malpractice attorney who will handle your issues.

Can I Press Assault Charges?
This Past Wekend A Co-Worker Came To My House Drunk From A Bar. When I Seen Her Kissing All Over My Man I Asked Her To Leave Our House. She Refused And Charged After Me. She Hit Me In The Face And I Hit Her Back To Get Her Off Guard To Get Away I Then Locked Myself In My Bedroom And Called The Cops. She Refused To Leave Even When Cops Got Here And Even When I Asked Her To Leave

You should press assault and trespassing charges against her.

I'm wondering why the cops didn't arrest her for public intoxication, assault, and trespassing. Also, why did they allow the boyfriend to drive while drunk?

Something doesn't add up in your question.

It seems like every other person in your story was against you, and since the police were there and didn't even arrest the other woman, I have to wonder what your real level of involvement was.

Is There A Web Site Where I Can View The Attorneys Photos?

try looking up the firm that the atty works for and in their bio, it might have a photo.